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Louie H. Yang
University of California, Davis
56Publications
23H-index
4,332Citations
Publications 56
Newest
Published on Apr 22, 2019in Ecology 4.62
Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis),
Richard Karban40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of California, Davis)
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Arthropod-plant Interactions
Ian S. Pearse3
Estimated H-index: 3
(United States Geological Survey),
Marshall S. McMunn4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of California, Davis),
Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis)
The seasonal assembly of arthropod communities is shaped by biotic and abiotic aspects of the habitat that limit the appearance or activity phenology of potential community members. In addition, previous interactions within the community, such as herbivore-induced plant defensive responses, aggregation, and predator avoidance likely affect the assembly of arthropod communities on individual plants. We observed the phenology of arthropod communities and defensive plant traits on 100 milkweed (Asc...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Ecological Monographs 7.83
Helen E. Chmura8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of California, Davis),
Heather M. Kharouba13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of California, Davis)
+ 3 AuthorsLouie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis)
Author(s): Chmura, HE; Kharouba, HM; Ashander, J; Ehlman, SM; Rivest, EB; Yang, LH | Abstract: © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America Species across a wide range of taxa and habitats are shifting phenological events in response to climate change. While advances are common, shifts vary in magnitude and direction within and among species, and the basis for this variation is relatively unknown. We examine previously suggested patterns of variation in phenological shifts in order to understand ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Ecology 4.62
Shahla Farzan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Davis),
Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ecology 4.62
Eric M. Lind17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Minnesota),
Kimberly J. La Pierre21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Colorado State University)
+ 9 AuthorsJustin P. Wright28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Duke University)
Increases in nutrient availability and alterations to mammalian herbivore communities are a hallmark of the Anthropocene, with consequences for the primary producer communities in many ecosystems. While progress has advanced understanding of plant community responses to these perturbations, the consequences for energy flow to higher trophic levels in the form of secondary production are less well understood. We quantified arthropod biomass after manipulating soil nutrient availability and wild m...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Heather V. Kenny1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Davis),
Amber N. Wright10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 3 AuthorsThomas W. Schoener63
Estimated H-index: 63
(University of California, Davis)
Resource pulses are brief periods of unusually high resource abundance. While population and community responses to resource pulses have been relatively well studied, how individual consumers respond to resource pulses has received less attention. Local consumers are often the first to respond to a resource pulse, and the form and timing of individual responses may influence how the effects of the pulse are transmitted throughout the community. Previous studies in Bahamian food webs have shown t...
2 Citations Source Cite
Jonah Piovia-Scott13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Amber N. Wright10
Estimated H-index: 10
The trophic cascade has emerged as a key paradigm in ecology. Although ecologists have made progress in understanding spatial variation in the strength of trophic cascades, temporal variation remains relatively unexplored. Our review suggests that strong trophic cascades are often transient, appearing when ecological conditions support high consumer abundance and rapidly growing, highly edible prey. Persistent top-down control is expected to decay over time in the absence of external drivers, as...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Ecosphere 2.67
Jonah Piovia-Scott13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Washington State University),
Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis)
+ 2 AuthorsThomas W. Schoener63
Estimated H-index: 63
(University of California, Davis)
Introduced predators can have dramatic effects on island ecosystems, the magnitude of which are likely to vary with island characteristics. We investigated the influence of two important properties of islands—size and amount of resource subsidy—on the effects of an introduced predatory lizard (Anolis sagrei) on three groups of arthropod prey. Lizards were experimentally introduced to 16 islands that spanned gradients in vegetated area and seaweed deposition (a marine resource subsidy); 16 simila...
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Published on Jan 1, 2017
Eric M. Lind17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Kimberly J. La Pierre21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 9 AuthorsJustin P. Wright28
Estimated H-index: 28
Increases in nutrient availability and alterations to mammalian herbivore communities are a hallmark of the Anthropocene, with consequences for the primary producer communities in many ecosystems. While progress has advanced understanding of plant community responses to these perturbations, the consequences for energy flow to higher trophic levels in the form of secondary production are less well understood. We quantified arthropod biomass after manipulating soil nutrient availability and wild m...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in American Midland Naturalist 0.71
Shahla Farzan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Davis),
James A. Whitney (University of California, Davis), Louie H. Yang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Davis)
Abstract Spatial resource distribution and phenology are critical factors for the development, emergence, and reproduction of solitary hymenopterans. However, the biotic and abiotic conditions that drive changes in their spatiotemporal distributions remain poorly understood. We surveyed the cavity-nesting hymenopteran community in a region of California oak-chaparral habitat over 3 y. Most taxa had short seasonal activity periods, with >90% of observations occurring within a single month for six...
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