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Christine Campbell
University of Edinburgh
73Publications
19H-index
1,360Citations
Publications 73
Newest
#1Annemieke Bikker (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 11
#2Sara Macdonald (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 14
Last.MacleodUna (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
#1Colin McCowan (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 28
#2Paula McSkimming (Robertson Centre for Biostatistics)H-Index: 5
Last.Kathryn A. Robb (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 22
view all 12 authors...
We investigated demographic and clinical predictors of lower participation in bowel screening relative to breast and cervical screening. Data linkage study of routinely collected clinical data from 430,591 women registered with general practices in the Greater Glasgow & Clyde Health Board. Participation in the screening programmes was measured by attendance at breast or cervical screening or the return of a bowel screening kit. 72.6% of 159,993 women invited attended breast screening, 80.7% of 3...
#1Debbie Cavers (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 14
#2Liset Habets (LUMC: Leiden University Medical Center)H-Index: 1
Last.Christine CampbellH-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Purpose To identify the qualitative evidence on the experience of cancer and comorbid illness from the perspective of patients, carers and health care professionals to identify psycho-social support needs, experience of health care, and to highlight areas where more research is needed.
#1Sara Macdonald (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 14
#2Elaine Conway (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 1
Last.MacleodUna (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Though new or altered bodily sensations are a common occurrence they rarely transition to biomedically defined symptoms. When they do, sensations are subject to an appraisal process that can culminate in help-seeking. The transition has particular relevance for cancer diagnoses. Studies of 'symptom appraisal' in cancer patients typically conclude that failure to regard sensations as serious or 'symptom misattribution' results in lengthier help-seeking intervals. Though multiple influenc...
#1Debbie Cavers (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 14
#2Natalia Monteiro Calanzani (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 15
Last.Christine Campbell (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 19
view all 10 authors...
Bowel cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Bowel screening has been shown to reduce mortality and primary care interventions have been successful in increasing uptake of screening. Using evidence-based theory to inform the development of such interventions has been shown to increase their effectiveness. This study aimed to develop and refine a brief evidence-based intervention for eligible individuals whom have not responded to their last bowel screening invitation (n...
#1Domenica Coxon (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 3
#2Christine Campbell (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 19
Last.David Weller (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 40
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Over recent years there has been a growth in cancer early diagnosis (ED) research, which requires valid measurement of routes to diagnosis and diagnostic intervals. The Aarhus Statement, published in 2012, provided methodological guidance to generate valid data on these key pre-diagnostic measures. However, there is still a wide variety of measuring instruments of varying quality in published research. In this paper we test comprehension of self-completion ED questionnaire items, based on Aarhus...
Background: The increased burden of cancer has driven the development of health system level initiatives worldwide promoting early diagnosis. Although it is challenging to synthesize results of such complex, diverse initiatives, it is crucial to review the evidence to inform future programs and enhance transparency and accountability. Aim: We aimed to systematically review the literature on health system level initiatives promoting early diagnosis among the adult population, describing and categ...
#1Richard Papworth (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 1
#2Colin McCowan (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 28
Last.Katie A. Robb (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 1
view all 12 authors...
IntroductionPopulation-based screening has been shown to reduce cancer specific mortality. Within Scotland, three national screening programmes exist: breast, cervical and bowel. Despite being a common and preventable form of cancer, the uptake for bowel cancer screening among women lags behind that for breast and cervical cancer. Objectives and ApproachSince the benefits of screening accrue with participation, it is important to understand why differences in screening uptake exist. In this stud...
#1Karen Barnett (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 11
#2David Weller (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 40
Last.Christine Campbell (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 19
view all 10 authors...
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes using a guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBt) reduce CRC mortality. Interval cancers are diagnosed between screening rounds: reassurance from a negative gFOBt has the potential to influence the pathway to diagnosis of an interval colorectal cancer. Methods: Twenty-six semi-structured face-to-face interviews were carried out in Scotland and England, with individuals diagnosed with an interval colorectal cancer following a negative gFOBt r...
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