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M. J. Page
University College London
639Publications
67H-index
17.2kCitations
Publications 651
Newest
#1R. J. Ivison (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 54
#2M. J. Page (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 67
Last.U. Dudzevičiūtė (Durham University)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
HATLAS J084933.4+021443 was identified as a dusty starburst via its rest-frame far-infrared (far-IR) emission. Multi-frequency imaging and spectroscopy revealed a cluster of four dusty galaxies at z = 2.41, covering 80 kpc. Here, we use ALMA to confirm a more distant, fifth protocluster member, and present X-ray and rest-frame optical imaging spectroscopy of the brightest, an unlensed hyperluminous IR galaxy (HyLIRG). The data reveal broad Hα and bright [N II] lines, and bright X-ray emission, c...
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#1S. R. Oates (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 29
#2Sara Motta (University of Oxford)H-Index: 20
Last.Daniel Steeghs (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 42
view all 13 authors...
The black-hole binary, V404 Cyg, went into outburst in June 2015, after 26 years of X-ray quiescence. We observed the outburst with the Neil Gehrels Swift observatory. We present the optical/UV observations taken with the Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope, and compare them with the X-ray observations obtained with the Swift X-ray telescope. We find that dust extinction, affecting the optical/UV, does not correlate with absorption due to neutral hydrogen, which affects the X-ray emission. We s...
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#1M. J. Page (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 67
#2S. R. Oates (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 29
Last.Peter W. A. Roming (SwRI: Southwest Research Institute)H-Index: 33
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We examine the the emission from optically bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows as the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory first begins observing, following the slew to target the GRB, while the pointing of the Swift satellite is still settling. We verify the photometric quality of the UVOT settling data using bright stars in the field of view. In the majority of cases we find no problems with the settling exposure photometry, but in one case we exci...
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#1R. J. IvisonH-Index: 54
#2M. J. PageH-Index: 67
Last.U. Dudzeviciute (Durham University)
view all 7 authors...
HATLAS J084933.4+021443 was identified as a dusty starburst via its rest-frame far-IR emission. Multi-frequency imaging and spectroscopy revealed a cluster of four dusty galaxies at z = 2.41 covering 80 kpc. Here, we use ALMA to confirm a more distant, fifth protocluster member, and present X-ray and rest-frame optical imaging spectroscopy of the brightest, an unlensed hyperluminous IR galaxy (HyLIRG). The data reveal broad H \alpha and bright [N II] lines, and bright X-ray emission, characte...
#1N. Paul M. Kuin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 5
#2Kinwah Wu (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 34
Last.Eleonora Troja (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 44
view all 22 authors...
We acknowledge the efforts of the Swift planners. Swift and NuSTAR Data were retrieved from the Swift and NuSTAR archive at HEASARC/GSFC, and from the UK Swift Science Data Centre. We also used the CFHT archive hosted at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre operated by the National Research Council of Canada with the support of the Canadian Space Agency, and the WFCAM UKIRT data from the UKIDSSDR10PLUS data release from the WFCAM archive at the Royal Observatory Edinburgh. This work has been suppo...
12 CitationsSource
Aims. We aim to investigate and characterise the photoionised X-ray emission line regions within NGC 7469. Methods. We apply the photoionisation model, PION, within the spectral fitting code SPEX to analyse the 640 ks RGS spectrum of NGC 7469 gathered during an XMM-Newton observing campaign in 2015. Results. We find the emission line region in NGC 7469 to be multiphased, consisting of two narrow components with ionisation parameters of \log \xi = 0.4and 1.6. A third, broad emission component,...
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#1M. Symeonidis (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
#2M. J. Page (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 67
We investigate what shapes the infrared luminosity function of local galaxies by comparing it to the local infrared AGN luminosity function. The former corresponds to emission from dust heated by stars and AGN, whereas the latter includes emission from AGN-heated dust only. Our results show that infrared emission from AGN starts mixing into the galaxy luminosity function in the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) regime and becomes significant in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) regime, wit...
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#1S. W. K. Emery (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2M. J. Page (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 67
Last.M. De Pasquale (Istanbul University)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
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#1M. Symeonidis (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
#2M. J. Page (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 67
We investigate what powers hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs; LIR(8-1000um)>10^13 Lsun) at z~1-2, by examining the behaviour of the infrared AGN luminosity function in relation to the infrared galaxy luminosity function. The former corresponds to emission from AGN-heated dust only, whereas the latter includes emission from dust heated by stars and AGN. Our results show that the two luminosity functions are substantially different below 10^13 Lsun but converge in the HyLIRG regime. We find...
2 CitationsSource
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