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Mary Hesse
University of Cambridge
69Publications
12H-index
2,518Citations
Publications 69
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#1Mary Hesse (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 12
#1Mary HesseH-Index: 12
Standard analytic philosophy of language universally presupposes that normal descriptive terminology is literal, stable, and univocal. There are good reasons for this in the preoccupation of philosophy of language with logic, for a word-token that changes its "meaning" with time or context cannot be a formal element that is reidentifiable and substitutable wherever it appears in a logical system. And this makes the logical relations of equivalence and entailment unworkable.1 Now while neglect of...
ABSTRACT In their ‘Atlas of Rural Settlement in England’, Roberts and Wrathmell have used nineteenth-century sources to map the distributions of nucleated and dispersed settlement across England. They argue that the resulting patterns reflect in general terms many earlier types of distribution, for example Roman villas, pagan burials, pre-Norman place-names, and Domesday woodland. In this article I consider whether relevant data can be derived from Suffolk Domesday Book about the distribution of...
ABSTRACT Domesday Book for Suffolk and Norfolk is unique in including, for most vills, measures of ‘lengths’ and ‘widths’, expressed in leagues and furlongs. If multiplied together, these give areas smaller than the nineteenth-century parishes and amount to only about one-third of each hundred. The only plausible interpretation is that the linear measures are estimates of the extent of a vill's arable land, and might be numerically related to its caracute-value. This hypothesis is tested for fou...
#1Mary Hesse (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 12
Abstract In his theory of rational discourse, Habermas has made essential use of the concept of ‘force of the better argument’. He does not explicitly discuss the theories of meaning and of inference that must underpin this concept, but usually construes it in terms of univocal meaning and propositional inference. These assumptions are challenged by means of examples from the use of metaphor and analogical argument in science, and it is suggested that a generalisation of such arguments applies t...
#1Mary Hesse (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 12
"Feminist epistemology": on the face of it this is a contradiction in terms. "Feminism" has its origins in a social subgroup, which has tended to be particu larist, separatist, and even sexist; "epistemology" is the study of the conditions of knowledge, or more modestly of justified belief, which are common to human beings as such. The question whether we can or cannot attain such conditions ra tionally is one of the most important topics of debate in modern philosophy, and it by no means depend...
#1Mary HesseH-Index: 12
In the English-speaking tradition of philosophy of language it has generally been taken for granted that the ideal rational language is literal and univocal and has a unique relation to truth. Its relation to the real world is atomistic, that is to say, small portions of language, whether words, phrases, or sentences, attach themselves to the world by some kind of correspondence or truth conditions, in a way that is essentially independent of linguistic context. The presence of metaphors and oth...
#1Mary Hesse (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 12
The related problems of metaphor and analogical reasoning have recently become of interest within three separate disciplines: philosophy of science, philosophy of language, and Artificial Intelligence. Classically the study of analogy has been concerned with analogical meaning (related to metaphor), and with analogical argument, which was seen in standard logic texts up to the 19th century as a very poor relation of inductive and hypothetical reasoning.1 These two aspects began to come together ...
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