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Hongyi Kang
University of Rochester Medical Center
13Publications
8H-index
2,150Citations
Publications 13
Newest
#1Sitong Zhou (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 3
#2Michael Giannetto (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 1
Last.Jiandi Wan (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 23
view all 13 authors...
The tight coupling between cerebral blood flow and neural activity is a key feature of normal brain function and forms the basis of functional hyperemia. The mechanisms coupling neural activity to vascular responses, however, remain elusive despite decades of research. Recent studies have shown that cerebral functional hyperemia begins in capillaries, and red blood cells (RBCs) act as autonomous regulators of brain capillary perfusion. RBCs then respond to local changes of oxygen tension ( P O 2...
2 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin A. Plog (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 12
#2Nanhong LouH-Index: 12
Last.G. Edward VatesH-Index: 16
view all 10 authors...
Source
#1Evan Daniel McConnell (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 3
#2Helen S. Wei (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 4
Last.G. Edward Vates (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains one of the more devastating forms of stroke due in large part to delayed cerebral ischemia that appears days to weeks following the initial hemorrhage. Therapies exclusively targeting large caliber arterial vasospasm have fallen short, and thus we asked whether capillary dysfunction contributes to delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Using a mouse model of subarachnoid hemorrhage and two-photon microscopy we showed capillary dysfunct...
11 CitationsSource
#1Helen S. Wei (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 4
#2Hongyi Kang (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 8
Last.Jiandi Wan (RIT: Rochester Institute of Technology)H-Index: 23
view all 12 authors...
Summary Energy production in the brain depends almost exclusively on oxidative metabolism. Neurons have small energy reserves and require a continuous supply of oxygen (O 2 ). It is therefore not surprising that one of the hallmarks of normal brain function is the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow and neuronal activity. Since capillaries are embedded in the O 2 -consuming neuropil, we have here examined whether activity-dependent dips in O 2 tension drive capillary hyperemia. In vivo an...
52 CitationsSource
#1Iben Lundgaard (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 6
#2Baoman Li (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 4
Last.Rashid Deane (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 46
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The brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source, but whether glucose is directly taken up by neurons or whether it is converted to lactate by astrocytes before neuronal uptake is still unclear. Here the authors perform in vivo imaging in awake mice and show evidence in support of the direct uptake of glucose by neurons.
129 CitationsSource
#1Hedok LeeH-Index: 15
#2Lulu Xie (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 5
Last.Helene BenvenisteH-Index: 38
view all 8 authors...
The glymphatic pathway expedites clearance of waste, including soluble amyloid β (Aβ) from the brain. Transport through this pathway is controlled by the brain's arousal level because, during sleep or anesthesia, the brain's interstitial space volume expands (compared with wakefulness), resulting in faster waste removal. Humans, as well as animals, exhibit different body postures during sleep, which may also affect waste removal. Therefore, not only the level of consciousness, but also body post...
77 CitationsSource
#1Helen S. WeiH-Index: 4
Last.G. Edward VatesH-Index: 16
view all 7 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Helen S. Wei (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 1
#2Takahiro Takano (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 39
Last.G. Edward Vates (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 3
view all 9 authors...
Activity-dependent increases in blood flow comprise the basis for functional brain imaging and are considered a hallmark of normal brain function. The central dogma of blood flow regulation states that flow changes effected by arteriolar tone drive functional hyperemia and that the capillary bed is a passive conduit for hyperemia resulting from upstream vasodilation. Recent evidence has begun to challenge this convention in cerebral blood flow control and suggests that pericytes may dilate capil...
#1Benjamin T. Kress (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 11
#2Jeffrey J. Iliff (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 26
Last.Rashid Deane (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 46
view all 13 authors...
Objective: In the brain, protein waste removal is partly performed by paravascular pathways that facilitate convective exchange of water and soluble contents between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF). Several lines of evidence suggest that bulk flow drainage via the glymphatic system is driven by cerebrovascular pulsation, and is dependent on astroglial water channels that line paravascular CSF pathways. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the efficiency of C...
296 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin A. Plog (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 12
#2Katherine M. Moll (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 2
Last.G. Edward Vates (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurologic catastrophe and poor outcome is typically attributed to vasospasm; however, there is also evidence that SAH causes a pro-inflammatory state and these two phenomena may be interrelated. SAH causes activation of microglia, but the time course and degree of microglial activation after SAH and its link to poor patient outcome and vasospasm remains unknown.
12 CitationsSource
12