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Lori T. Quakenbush
Alaska Department of Fish and Game
58Publications
17H-index
952Citations
Publications 60
Newest
#1Russel D. AndrewsH-Index: 22
#2Robin W. BairdH-Index: 1
Last.Yoko MitaniH-Index: 12
view all 21 authors...
1 Citations
#1Rebecca McGuire (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)
#2Robert SuydamH-Index: 19
Last.Abby N. Powell (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 19
view all 4 authors...
Most king (Somateria spectabilis) and common eiders (S. mollissima v-nigra) breeding in the northwestern Nearctic migrate past Point Barrow, Alaska. Spring migration counts have been conducted there since 1953; during 1976–1996, both species declined > 50% for unknown reasons. To evaluate population trends, counts in 2003, 2004, 2015, and 2016 were compared to earlier counts. King eider estimates were 304,966 (95% CI ± 76,254) in 2003, 591,961 (± 172,011) in 2004, 796,419 (± 304,011) in 2015, an...
Source
#1Mark NelsonH-Index: 3
#2Lori T. QuakenbushH-Index: 17
Last.Brian D. TarasH-Index: 3
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Source
Last.Nicholas M. Kellar (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 12
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Justin A. Crawford (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 2
#2Kathryn J. FrostH-Index: 21
Last.Alex WhitingH-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
Changing environmental conditions in the Pacific Arctic are expected to affect ice-adapted marine food webs. As such, understanding ringed seal (Pusa hispida) dive and haul-out behavior is vital to understanding if and how these environmental changes affect seal foraging behavior. Working with Alaska Native subsistence hunters, we tagged 14 adult and 20 subadult ringed seals with satellite-linked data recorders in Kotzebue Sound, Alaska, during late-September and October 2007–2009. Information a...
Source
#1John J. Citta (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 10
#2Gregory O'Corry-Crowe (Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute)H-Index: 3
Last.Brooke Potgieter (Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute)H-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1T. Aran Mooney (WHOI: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)H-Index: 17
#2Manuel Castellote (Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean)H-Index: 1
Last.Caroline E. C. Goertz (Alaska SeaLife Center)H-Index: 9
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Mark NelsonH-Index: 3
#2Lori T. QuakenbushH-Index: 17
Last.Matthew J. WoollerH-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1T. Aran Mooney (WHOI: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)H-Index: 17
#2Manuel Castellote (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 11
Last.Caroline E. C. Goertz (Alaska SeaLife Center)H-Index: 9
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACT Documenting hearing abilities is vital to understanding a species’ acoustic ecology and for predicting the impacts of increasing anthropogenic noise. Cetaceans use sound for essential biological functions such as foraging, navigation and communication; hearing is considered to be their primary sensory modality. Yet, we know little regarding the hearing of most, if not all, cetacean populations, which limits our understanding of their sensory ecology, population level variability and the...
2 CitationsSource
#1Greg O’Corry-Crowe (Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute)H-Index: 6
#2Robert SuydamH-Index: 19
Last.Barbara A. Mahoney (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 7
view all 11 authors...
The annual return of beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, to traditional seasonal locations across the Arctic may involve migratory culture, while the convergence of discrete summering aggregations on common wintering grounds may facilitate outbreeding. Natal philopatry and cultural inheritance, however, has been difficult to assess as earlier studies were of too short a duration, while genetic analyses of breeding patterns, especially across the beluga’s Pacific range, have been hampered by in...
6 CitationsSource
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