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E. Tory Higgins
Columbia University
Developmental psychologyPsychologyCognitive psychologyRegulatory focus theorySocial psychology
376Publications
88H-index
36.5kCitations
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Publications 378
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#1Emily Nakkawita (Columbia University)
#2Frank Mathmann (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. E. Tory Higgins (Columbia University)H-Index: 88
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Abstract How do individual differences in motivation relate to risky decision-making? The objective of the present study was to explore this question within a real-world situation in which participants invested in Bitcoin, a risky asset. The article focuses on cases of a socially-defined counterfactual loss—situations in which the people in one's social context experience a gain, which functions as a new reference point against which the individual falls short. Although a prevention focus is kno...
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Receiving social support can entail both costs and benefits for recipients. Thus, theories of effective support have proposed that support should address recipients' needs to be beneficial. This paper proposes the importance of support that addresses recipients' self-regulatory needs. We present a novel construct-regulatory effectiveness of support (RES)-which posits that support that addresses recipients' needs to understand their situation (truth) and to feel capable of managing their situatio...
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#1E. Tory HigginsH-Index: 88
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Regulatory focus theory distinguishes between two different value concerns: promotion concerns with advancement and growth, and prevention concerns with safety and security. Since its publication m...
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#1E. Tory Higgins (Columbia University)H-Index: 88
#2Emily Nakkawita (Columbia University)
Last. James F. M. Cornwell (Military Academy)
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#1Xi ZouH-Index: 9
#2Abigail A. ScholerH-Index: 16
Last. E. HigginsH-Index: 1
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#1Judith Knausenberger (WWU: University of Münster)H-Index: 2
#2Ullrich Wagner (WWU: University of Münster)H-Index: 23
Last. Gerald Echterhoff (WWU: University of Münster)H-Index: 18
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In times of widespread science skepticism, it is important to understand when and how lay people draw on experts’ opinions to form judgments. We examined whether participants are more likely to create a shared reality with a communication partner having high epistemic authority than with audiences having lower epistemic authority. In Experiment 1, participants described an ambiguously presented target person to a lay audience or an expert audience (a personnel psychologist) who judged the target...
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#1James F. M. Cornwell (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 10
#2Carl P. Jago (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
Last. E. Tory Higgins (Columbia University)H-Index: 88
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AbstractWe investigated whether group influence can change judgments even for high-consensus (i.e., unambiguous) moral norms. We found that participants often matched the judgment of the other curr...
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#1James F. M. Cornwell (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 10
#2E. Tory Higgins (Columbia University)H-Index: 88
Many researchers in moral psychology approach the topic of moral judgment in terms of value—assessing outcomes of behaviors as either harmful or helpful which makes the behaviors wrong or right, respectively. However, recent advances in motivation science suggest that other motives may be at work as well—namely truth (wanting to establish what is real) and control (wanting to manage what happens). In this review, we argue that the epistemic experiences of observers of (im)moral behaviors, and th...
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Recent research in moral psychology has highlighted how the current internal states of observers can influence their moral judgments of others’ actions. In this article, we argue that an important internal state that serves such a function is the sense of control one has over one’s own actions. Across four studies, we show that an individual’s own current sense of control is positively associated with the intensity of moral judgments of the actions of others. We also show that this effect extend...
1 CitationsSource
#1Rajesh KumarH-Index: 19
#2Gerben A. van Kleef (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 44
Last. E. Tory Higgins (Columbia University)H-Index: 88
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This article utilizes a motivational perspective on emotions to reconceptualize the impact of negative emotions on relationship dynamics between alliance partners. Alliance failure is endemic and y...
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