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Marjorie Johnstone
Dalhousie University
NeoliberalismSociologySocial workInternational educationSocial science
21Publications
5H-index
63Citations
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Publications 22
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#1Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
#2Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
1 CitationsSource
#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
Last. Jessica HerschmanH-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
As therapy progresses, alliances become more complex and are constantly negotiated. Analyzing transcripts from video-taped actual therapy sessions, this article examines how a client and therapist from different cultures negotiate to assert and/or compromise their goals and tasks in psychotherapy. Using the Negotiation of Therapy Agenda (NOTA), we conduct a turn-by-turn analysis to examine discursive patterns deployed by the client and therapist in cross-cultural interactions. Findings illustrat...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2Bradyn Ko (ICAP)
Last. Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
The phenomenon of the internationalization of education has been prevalent in developed western countries, with varied and at times contested discourses about international education and students. ...
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#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
Equity is inherent to democracy and the stated mission of the social work profession. We contend that neoliberal values re-define democracy, as if market-driven ideology, practices, and modes of governance are the essence of democracy, and this further precludes us from re-imagining democracy-to-come. To illustrate how democracy is undergoing a metamorphosis, we use the international education policies in Canada as a case study. Informed by Deleuze and Guattari’s work on the construct of the rhi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2A. Ka Tat Tsang (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 13
Last. Jessica HerschmanH-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTThis article explores how multiple contexts – professional knowledge (e.g. case management), institutional practices (e.g. New Public Management), and mental health policies and legislations (e.g. Mental Health Act) – under neoliberal governance (re)produce ways social workers interact with their clients in moment-to-moment interactions. It is part of a larger process and outcome research project on cross-cultural social work practice in outpatient community mental health settings in an ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eunjung Lee (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 1
#2A. Ka Tat Tsang (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 13
Last. Monique Ryan (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 1
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: Epistemic injustice occurs when therapists implicitly and explicitly impose professional and institutional power onto clients. When clients have a diagnosis of schizophrenia, this very fact further complicates and highlights the power disparity within the helping relationship. Inspired by the work of critical philosopher Miranda Fricker on epistemic injustice, and using critical theories of language and knowledge, this article analyzes audiotaped session transcripts between a client with a his...
2 CitationsSource
#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2Jessica HerschmanH-Index: 4
Last. Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTA client’s experience of being heard and understood by a social worker contributes to not only fostering alliance and positive outcomes in practice, but also positioning the client as the knower of their own experience. One’s capacity to be recognized as a trustworthy conveyer of knowledge is essential to achieving a sense of human value. Philosopher Miranda Fricker describes this recognition as epistemic justice. When the client’s experiences are discredited/marginalized, epistemic inju...
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#1Marjorie Johnstone (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 5
#2Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
ABSTRACTIn this article we use the theoretical framework of epistemic injustice to examine different forms of state violence against racially marginalized people. We use the two-decade public debate on the Toronto police practice of “carding,” recent examples of the police use of lethal force, and economic disparity and structural inequity, as entry points to discuss exclusion and the criminalization of race. Finally we discuss how racialized people in Canada resist practices of epistemic injust...
Source
#1Eunjung Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
#2A. Ka Tat Tsang (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 13
Last. Jessica HerschmanH-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTRuptures, including racial microaggressions, are inevitable in therapy. Because they are subtle and subject to alternative explanations, identifying and illustrating racial microaggressions have been challenging. To critically reflect on such ruptures and ultimately repair the alliance with clients, scholars urge the significance of studying “how” racial microaggressions emerge and become visible in psychotherapy. Drawn from transcripts of actual therapy sessions, we select segments wher...
2 CitationsSource
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