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Michael J. Schuster
University of Minnesota
EcosystemInvasive speciesEcologyPlant communityBiology
19Publications
5H-index
91Citations
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Publications 19
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#1Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
#2Peter D. Wragg (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 17
Last. Peter B. Reich (University of Western Sydney)H-Index: 137
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Forest light availability strongly regulates understory community composition, and low availability may confer resistance to invasion by exotic species, yet common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.) invades North American temperate forests with a broad range of light habitats. It is unclear to what extent buckthorn’s success is due to high mid-season shade tolerance versus shade avoidance permitted by early leaf out and late senescence. We used buckthorn seedlings planted into a forest d...
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#1Carl Anfang (UMN: University of Minnesota)
#2Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
Last. Peter B. Reich (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 137
view all 4 authors...
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#1Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
#2Peter B. ReichH-Index: 137
Acer ginnala Maxim. (Amur maple) is a growing threat to woodland systems in North America. Despite this, Amur maple has been largely ignored by ecologists, and scientific understanding of the species is mostly limited to anecdotal evidence from land managers. We evaluated the cover and richness of native and exotic understory plant communities under Amur maple canopies, native tree canopies, and nearby open areas near St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. Overall, Amur maple created dense canopies that only...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
#2Peter D. Wragg (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 17
Last. Peter B. Reich (University of Western Sydney)H-Index: 137
view all 3 authors...
5 CitationsSource
#2Peter D. WraggH-Index: 17
Last. Peter B. ReichH-Index: 137
view all 3 authors...
A search strategy was developed to identify literature on the use of revegetation as a strategy to suppress reinvasion of invasive species in grasslands and forests. This dataset summarizes the data points for each article included in the literature analysis.
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#1Xiao Sun (NAU: Nanjing Agricultural University)H-Index: 3
#2Yue Shen (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 5
Last. Yingjun Zhang (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 14
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Abstract Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs can alter the stoichiometry of senesced plant tissues, a key trait controlling nutrient cycling. However, it is unclear how fertilization rate affects plant litter tissue chemistry under varied N:P supply ratios. In a 2-year study, we investigated the effects of N and P supply rates at three N:P input ratios (4:1, 16:1, and 60:1) on the chemical constitution and N:P stoichiometry of the litter of two grasses: Leymus chinensis and Stip...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
#2Jeffrey S. Dukes (Purdue University)H-Index: 49
Although encroaching woody plants have reduced the global extent of grasslands, continuing increases in soil nitrogen availability could slow this trend by favoring resident herbaceous species. At the same time, projected increases in rainfall variability could promote woody encroachment by aligning spatiotemporal patterns of soil moisture availability with the needs of woody species. We evaluated the responses of two deciduous woody species to these simulated environmental changes by planting s...
4 CitationsSource
#1Michael J. Schuster (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 5
#2Jürgen Kreyling (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 16
Last. Anke Jentsch (University of Bayreuth)H-Index: 40
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Background and aims Leaf litters commonly interact during decomposition in ways that can synergistically increases rates of decay. These interactions have been linked to moisture availability, suggesting that drought could slow decomposition rates by disrupting litter interactions. Slowed decomposition may reduce competitive ability of exotic species that exploit rapid decomposition rates as part of niche construction mechanisms. Here, we evaluated the impacts of drought on interactions between ...
3 CitationsSource
#2Jeffrey S. DukesH-Index: 49
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