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Rosamond L. Naylor
Stanford University
151Publications
44H-index
19.8kCitations
Publications 151
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#1Elsa M. Ordway (Stanford University)H-Index: 1
#2Rosamond L. Naylor (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
Last.Eric F. Lambin (UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)H-Index: 77
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Oil palm expansion resulted in 2 million hectares (Mha) of forest loss globally in 2000–2010. Despite accounting for 24% (4.5 Mha) of the world’s total oil palm cultivated area, expansion dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa have been overlooked. We show that in Southwest Cameroon, a top producing region of Africa, 67% of oil palm expansion from 2000–2015 occurred at the expense of forest. Contrary to the publicized narrative of industrial-scale expansion, most oil palm expansion and associated defore...
#1Rosamond L. Naylor (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
#2Matthew M. Higgins (Stanford University)H-Index: 2
Last.Walter P. Falcon (Stanford University)H-Index: 22
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Indonesia’s oil palm expansion during the last two decades has resulted in widespread environmental and health damages through land clearing by fire and peat conversion, but it has also contributed to rural poverty alleviation. In this paper, we examine the role that decentralization has played in the process of Indonesia’s oil palm development, particularly among independent smallholder producers. We use primary survey information, along with government documents and statistics, to analyze the ...
#1Halimatou Alaofè (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 7
#2Jennifer Burney (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 11
Last.Douglas L TarenH-Index: 25
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Objective: To examine the impacts of a Solar Market Garden 1-year solar-powered drip irrigation (SMG) programme in Kalale district of northern Benin on mothers’ nutritional status and micronutrient levels. Design: Using a quasi-experimental design, sixteen villages were assigned to four groups: (i) SMG women’s groups (WG); (ii) comparison WG; (iii) SMG non-WG (NWG); and (iv) comparison NWG. Difference-in-differences (DID) estimates were used to assess impacts on mothers’ food consumption, divers...
#1Curtis Deutsch (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 34
#2Joshua J. Tewksbury (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 5
Last.Rosamond L. Naylor (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
view all 6 authors...
#1Bing Wang (Stanford University)H-Index: 5
#2Ling Cao (Stanford University)H-Index: 14
Last.Oliver B. Fringer (Stanford University)H-Index: 26
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Aquaculture in many countries around the world has become the biggest source of seafood for human consumption. While it alleviates the pressure on wild capture fisheries, the long-term impacts of large-scale, intensive aquaculture on natural coastal systems need to be better understood. In particular, aquaculture may alter habitat and exceed the carrying capacity of coastal marine ecosystems. In this paper, we develop a high-resolution numerical model for Sanggou Bay, one of the largest kelp and...
#1Curtis Deutsch (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 34
#2Joshua J. Tewksbury (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 5
Last.Rosamond L. Naylor (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
view all 7 authors...
Insect pests substantially reduce yields of three staple grains—rice, maize, and wheat—but models assessing the agricultural impacts of global warming rarely consider crop losses to insects. We use established relationships between temperature and the population growth and metabolic rates of insects to estimate how and where climate warming will augment losses of rice, maize, and wheat to insects. Global yield losses of these grains are projected to increase by 10 to 25% per degree of global mea...
#1Michelle Tigchelaar (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 5
#2David S. Battisti (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 52
Last.Deepak K. Ray (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 21
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Meeting the global food demand of roughly 10 billion people by the middle of the 21st century will become increasingly challenging as the Earth’s climate continues to warm. Earlier studies suggest that once the optimum growing temperature is exceeded, mean crop yields decline and the variability of yield increases even if interannual climate variability remains unchanged. Here, we use global datasets of maize production and climate variability combined with future temperature projections to quan...
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