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Erica Di Ruggiero
University of Toronto
38Publications
9H-index
283Citations
Publications 38
Newest
Corey McAuliffe (U of T: University of Toronto), Ross Upshur46
Estimated H-index: 46
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 1 AuthorsErica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto)
The ways in which global health students experience trauma/distress while conducting global health fieldwork is understudied. No identifiable literature addresses the risks to students’ mental well-being, although physical wellness checks exist. Importantly, global health practitioners are at greater risk than the general population for moral distress, secondary-traumatic stress disorder, vicarious traumatization, compassion fatigue, burnout, stress, and anxiety. Students face increased risks (e...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Globalization and Health 3.03
Uttam Bajwa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Denise Gastaldo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 1 AuthorsLilian Knorr1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Royal Bank of Canada)
Background The “gig” economy connects consumers with contractors (or workers) through online platform businesses to perform tasks (or “gigs”). This innovation in technology provides businesses and consumers access to low-cost, on-demand labour, but gig workers’ experiences are more complex. They have access to very flexible, potentially autonomous work, but also deal with challenges caused by the nature of the work, its precariousness, and their relationships with the platform businesses. Worker...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 29, 2018
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Danielle MacPherson1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Uttam Bajwa1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2018in International Journal of Public Health
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Zee Leung1
Estimated H-index: 1
(International Development Research Centre)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hallen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(International Development Research Centre)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 13, 2018in Critical Public Health 2.41
Eric Mykhalovskiy21
Estimated H-index: 21
(York University),
Katherine L. Frohlich23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UdeM: Université de Montréal)
+ 3 AuthorsLeigha Comer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(York University)
AbstractThis article is about a mode of scholarly practice we call critical social science with public health. The article responds to our dissatisfaction with established approaches to social science engagement with public health that have developed out of Straus’ early distinction between sociology in and of medicine. By critical social science with public health we mean a set of research practices that orients to epistemological and political differences between social science and public heal...
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Published on Apr 1, 2018
Peter Craig14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Medical Research Council),
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 12 AuthorsFrank Kee51
Estimated H-index: 51
('QUB': Queen's University Belfast)
Additional co-authors: Blake Poland, Valery Ridde, Jeannie Shoveller, Sarah Viehbeck,and Daniel Wight
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in International Journal of Public Health
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto)
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Published on Jan 1, 2018in BioMed Research International 2.58
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Nancy Edwards30
Estimated H-index: 30
(U of O: University of Ottawa)
Objectives. The objective of this paper is to investigate what participatory health research (PHR) can offer implementation research (IR) and vice versa and discuss what health research funders can do to foster the intersection of both fields. Methods. We contrast points of divergence and convergence between IR and PHR. We reflect on whether community engagement is necessary and on the unintended consequences of participation in IR. We describe how a research funder can incentivize PHR in IR. Re...
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Published on Dec 1, 2017in Health Research Policy and Systems 2.18
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Natalie Kishchuk12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UdeM: Université de Montréal)
+ 4 AuthorsHeather Smith Fowler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Social Research and Demonstration Corporation)
Background The Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada (PHIRIC) is a multi-stakeholder alliance founded in 2006 to advance population health intervention research (PHIR). PHIRIC aimed to strengthen Canada’s capacity to conduct and use such research to inform policy and practice to improve the public’s health by building PHIR as a field of research. In 2014, an evaluative study of PHIRIC at organisational and system levels was conducted, guided by a field-building and collab...
2 Citations Source Cite
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