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Rebecca M. Todd
University of British Columbia
63Publications
22H-index
1,299Citations
Publications 67
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#1Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
#2Vladimir Miskovic (Binghamton University)H-Index: 19
Last.Adam K. Anderson (Cornell University)H-Index: 42
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Recent advances in our understanding of information states in the human brain have opened a new window into the brain's representation of emotion. While emotion was once thought to constitute a sep...
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#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones, and can distract attention from competing tasks. Yet less is known about underlying neurobiological processes. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials are sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. Here we wished to examine whether individual differences in norepinephrine activity play a role in emotionally-biased compe...
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#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Alan Kingstone (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 32
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 3 authors...
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#1Mana R. Ehlers (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 3
#2Colin J. D. Ross (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 35
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 3 authors...
Previous research has established a role for the norepinephrine (NE)/stress system in individual differences in biases to attend to reward or punishment. Outstanding questions concern its role in the flexibility with which such biases can be changed. The goal of this preregistered study was to examine the role of the NE/stress system in the degree to which biases can be trained along the axis of valence in the direction of reward. Participants genotyped for a common deletion variant of ADRA2b (l...
3 CitationsSource
#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Abstract It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones, and can distract attention from competing tasks. Yet less is known about underlying neurobiological processes. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials are sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. Here we wished to examine whether individual differences in norepinephrine activity play a role in emotionally-bia...
Source
#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Abstract It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones, and can distract attention from competing tasks. Yet less is known about underlying neurobiological processes. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials are sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. Here we wished to examine whether individual differences in norepinephrine activity play a role in emotionally-bia...
Source
#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Abstract It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones, and can distract attention from competing tasks. Yet less is known about underlying neurobiological processes. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials are sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. Here we wished to examine whether individual differences in norepinephrine activity play a role in emotionally-bia...
Source
#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Abstract It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones, and can distract attention from competing tasks. Yet less is known about underlying neurobiological processes. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials are sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. Here we wished to examine whether individual differences in norepinephrine activity play a role in emotionally-bia...
Source
#1Kevin H. Roberts (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Maria G. M. Manaligod (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last.Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
It is well established that emotionally salient stimuli evoke greater visual cortex activation than neutral ones and can distract attention from competing tasks. However, less is known about the underlying neurobiological processes that give rise to such effects. As a proxy of population level biased competition, EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials measured at the scalp can be sensitive to competition effects from salient stimuli. In the present study, we wished to examine whether individu...
Source
#1James H. Kryklywy (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 6
#2Rebecca M. Todd (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
[Peer commentary on “Visual selection: usually fast and automatic; seldom slow and volitional,” by J. Theeuwes]. Journal of Cognition. In his current opinion piece, Theeuwes emphasizes the role of selection history as a third source of attentional selection, beyond top-down and bottom-up mechanisms, thus challenging traditional dual-process models of attention. While we agree that selection history impacts the allocation of attention, our own work suggests that this terminology may be too restri...
3 CitationsSource
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