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Katherine L. Buchanan
Deakin University
Sexual selectionEcologyCorticosteroneBiologyZoology
141Publications
38H-index
5,641Citations
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Publications 144
Newest
#1Simon C. Griffith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 44
#2Samuel C. Andrew (Macquarie University)H-Index: 6
Last. Mylene M. Mariette (Macquarie University)H-Index: 16
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#1Harrison J.F. Eyck (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
#1Harrison J.F. Eyck (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Last. Katherine L. Buchanan (Deakin University)H-Index: 38
view all 5 authors...
The developmental environment an animal experiences can have a pervasive and sustained effect on phenotype throughout its life. Animals exposed to suboptimal conditions during development can experience physiological trade-offs, leading to seemingly negative phenotypic changes in later life that have been hypothesised to have detrimental effects on fitness. However, few studies have investigated how exposure to suboptimal developmental conditions affects an animal’s reproductive behavior and fit...
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#1Vincent Careau (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 23
#2Mylene M. Mariette (Deakin University)H-Index: 16
Last. Katherine L. Buchanan (Deakin University)H-Index: 38
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Animals have well-documented individual differences in their behaviour, including in their response to stressful stimuli. The physiological bases for the repeatability of these traits has been the focus of much research in recent years, in an attempt to explain the mechanistic drivers for behavioral syndromes. Whilst a range of studies have demonstrated repeatable individual differences in physiological traits, little is known about potential trade-offs between reproductive investment a...
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#1Ondi L. Crino (Deakin University)H-Index: 12
#2Stephanie C. Driscoll (Macquarie University)H-Index: 3
Last. Simon C. Griffith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 44
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Abstract Animals time reproductive events to overlap with periods of favorable environmental conditions. However, weather conditions can be unpredictable. Young animals may be particularly susceptible to extreme weather during sensitive developmental periods. Here, we investigated the effects of adverse weather conditions on corticosterone levels (a hormone linked to the avian stress response) and body condition of wild nestling zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We sought to tease apart the d...
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#1Mylene M. Mariette (Deakin University)H-Index: 16
#2Katherine L. Buchanan (Deakin University)H-Index: 38
Exposing wild-caught eggs to audio playbacks in the lab reveals that avian embryos can communicate predation risk to their siblings before hatching. This prenatal communication, which possibly occurs through vibrational cues, coordinates the developmental trajectories of the clutch.
1 CitationsSource
#1Mylene M. Mariette (Deakin University)H-Index: 16
#2Katherine L. Buchanan (Deakin University)H-Index: 38
1 CitationsSource
#1Harrison J.F. Eyck (Deakin University)H-Index: 1
#2Katherine L. Buchanan (Deakin University)H-Index: 38
Last. Tim S. Jessop (Deakin University)H-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mathew L. Berg (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 16
#2Ben Knott (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 6
Last. Andrew T. D. Bennett (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 34
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Abstract Conspicuous coloration can indicate phenotypic quality, and may reflect exposure or vulnerability to stress, or access to essential nutrients such as pigments. Although the production of pigmented colours is well understood, much less is known about how structural colours are affected by physiological state. In this study, we tested whether glucocorticoids (corticosterone) predicted expression of plumage coloration in an Australian parrot, the crimson rosella (Platycercus elegans). Parr...
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