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Katherine L. Buchanan
Deakin University
138Publications
38H-index
5,382Citations
Publications 138
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2019in General and Comparative Endocrinology2.44
Mathew L. Berg16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Ben Knott6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UoB: University of Bristol)
+ 2 AuthorsAndrew T. D. Bennett32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Abstract Conspicuous coloration can indicate phenotypic quality, and may reflect exposure or vulnerability to stress, or access to essential nutrients such as pigments. Although the production of pigmented colours is well understood, much less is known about how structural colours are affected by physiological state. In this study, we tested whether glucocorticoids (corticosterone) predicted expression of plumage coloration in an Australian parrot, the crimson rosella ( Platycercus elegans ). Pa...
Published on Jul 22, 2019in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Mylene M. Mariette16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Deakin University),
Katherine L. Buchanan38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Deakin University)
Exposing wild-caught eggs to audio playbacks in the lab reveals that avian embryos can communicate predation risk to their siblings before hatching. This prenatal communication, which possibly occurs through vibrational cues, coordinates the developmental trajectories of the clutch.
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Biological Reviews10.29
Harrison Jf Eyck (Deakin University), Katherine L. Buchanan38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Deakin University)
+ 1 AuthorsTim S. Jessop24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Deakin University)
Published on Apr 3, 2019
Anna Miltiadous (Deakin University), Sarah R. Pryke7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University)
+ 1 AuthorsKatherine L. Buchanan38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Deakin University)
ABSTRACTMaternal hormones are thought to play an important role in determining the rate of evolutionary adaptation. Previous avian studies have shown that the transfer of maternally derived hormones, such as progesterone and testosterone, to the egg, affects many aspects of offspring development. In contrast, the impact of maternal corticosterone (CORT) is much less studied. CORT, the principal avian glucocorticoid hormone, is thought to be passively transferred to the egg yolk from the maternal...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Trends in Ecology and Evolution15.24
Lynn B. Martin40
Estimated H-index: 40
(USF: University of South Florida),
BriAnne Addison8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Deakin University)
+ 23 AuthorsMarcel Klaassen44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Deakin University)
Individual hosts differ extensively in their competence for parasites, but traditional research has discounted this variation, partly because modeling such heterogeneity is difficult. This discounting has diminished as tools have improved and recognition has grown that some hosts, the extremely competent, can have exceptional impacts on disease dynamics. Most prominent among these hosts are the superspreaders, but other forms of extreme competence (EC) exist and others await discovery; each with...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Ornithology
Justin R. Eastwood5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Deakin University),
Mathew L. Berg16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Deakin University)
+ 3 AuthorsAndrew T. D. Bennett32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Deakin University)
Pathogens can have a profound impact on the population dynamics of avian populations. Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is considered one of the few pathogens capable of causing extinction, because it predominantly infects the highly threatened order Psittaciformes, the signs of disease are severe, and mortality can be extremely high. Little is known about BFDV in wild populations, particularly its distribution among wild breeding birds. We investigated patterns of BFDV infection in family g...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Conservation Biology6.19
Stephen T. Garnett27
Estimated H-index: 27
(CDU: Charles Darwin University),
Stephen T. Garnett15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CDU: Charles Darwin University)
+ 23 AuthorsLes Christidis16
Estimated H-index: 16
(SCU: Southern Cross University)
Although evidence-based approaches have become commonplace for determining the success of conservation measures for the management of threatened taxa, there are no standard metrics for assessing progress in research or management. We developed 5 metrics to meet this need for threatened taxa and to quantify the need for further action and effective alleviation of threats. These metrics (research need, research achievement, management need, management achievement, and percent threat reduction) can...
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