Match!
Bruno Lemke
Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology
28Publications
9H-index
613Citations
Publications 28
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in The Lancet59.10
Nick Watts6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UCL: University College London),
M. Amann44
Estimated H-index: 44
(IIASA: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis)
+ 65 AuthorsWenjia Cai19
Estimated H-index: 19
(THU: Tsinghua University)
The Lancet Countdown: tracking progress on health and climate change was established to provide an independent, global monitoring system dedicated to tracking the health dimensions of the impacts of, and the response to, climate change. The Lancet Countdown tracks 41 indicators across five domains: climate change impacts, exposures, and vulnerability; adaptation, planning, and resilience for health; mitigation actions and health co-benefits; finance and economics; and public and political engage...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in The Lancet Planetary Health
Oliver Andrews6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UEA: University of East Anglia),
Corinne Le Quéré58
Estimated H-index: 58
(UEA: University of East Anglia)
+ 2 AuthorsAndy Haines71
Estimated H-index: 71
(Lond: University of London)
Summary Background Changes in temperature and humidity due to climate change affect living and working conditions. An understanding of the effects of different global temperature changes on population health is needed to inform the continued implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement and to increase global ambitions for greater cuts in emissions. By use of historical and projected climate conditions, we aimed to investigate the effects of climate change on workability (ie, the ability to work...
Published on Mar 1, 2018in International Journal of Biometeorology2.38
Tord Kjellstrom43
Estimated H-index: 43
(ANU: Australian National University),
Chris Freyberg2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 2 AuthorsDavid Briggs30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Imperial College London)
Increased environmental heat levels as a result of climate change present a major challenge to the health, wellbeing and sustainability of human communities in already hot parts of this planet. This challenge has many facets from direct clinical health effects of daily heat exposure to indirect effects related to poor air quality, poor access to safe drinking water, poor access to nutritious and safe food and inadequate protection from disease vectors and environmental toxic chemicals. The incre...
Published on Mar 1, 2018in International Journal of Biometeorology2.38
Peter Bröde22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Technical University of Dortmund),
Dusan Fiala14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 1 AuthorsTord Kjellstrom43
Estimated H-index: 43
(ANU: Australian National University)
With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive st...
Published on Feb 1, 2018
Bruno Lemke9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Matthias Otto5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 1 AuthorsTord Kjellstrom4
Estimated H-index: 4
Background/Aim: Increasing environmental heat is the most predictable effect of climate change. In already hot areas this increase will create health risks, particularly for people who carry out physically demanding jobs. Excessive heat exposures will occur outdoors and indoors (without air conditioning). Low income people in tropical countries will be at the highest risk. The physiological evidence concerning heat impacts on workers is extensive, but epidemiological evidence is limited. Methods...
Published on Dec 1, 2017
Mt Chazalnoël1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
E Mach1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 6 AuthorsK Zander1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Occupational and Environmental Medicine3.56
Lauren Lines , Tord Kjellstrom43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Lund University)
+ 1 AuthorsBruno Lemke9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology)
Climate change will cause increasing environmental heat levels in large parts of the world. The heat levels for millions of people working outdoors or indoors without air conditioning, particularly in tropical areas, are already so high that physiological limits are exceeded and health risks and productivity loss occurs. Using data on climate and working population size for 67,000 geographic grid cells (size = 0.5 × 0.5 degrees) based on internationally refereed sources we produced global heat s...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Occupational and Environmental Medicine3.56
Tord Kjellstrom43
Estimated H-index: 43
(ANU: Australian National University),
Matthias Otto5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology)
+ 3 AuthorsLauren Lines (Cant.: University of Canterbury)
Thermal physiology science shows the health threats to workers caused by exposure to heat when doing heavy physical labour. Climate change increases environmental heat levels in most of the world and it is a key issue for climate change and health research. Our model links climate and workforce data (current and predicted) and estimates work capacity loss at individual and population level and related economic loss. The model incorporates climate conditions, population estimates, workforce distr...
Tord Kjellstrom43
Estimated H-index: 43
(ANU: Australian National University),
Bruno Lemke9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology),
Matthias Otto5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology)
Occupational health is particularly affected by high heat exposures in workplaces, which will be an increasing problem as climate change progresses. People working in jobs of moderate or heavy work intensity in hot environments are at particular risk, owing to exposure to high environmental heat and internal heat production. This heat needs to be released to protect health, and such release is difficult or impossible at high temperatures and high air humidity. A range of clinical health effects ...
123