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Gregory B. Melikyan
Emory University
EndosomeLipid bilayer fusionVirologyVirusBiology
56Publications
23H-index
2,069Citations
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Publications 60
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#1Yen-Cheng ChenH-Index: 1
#2Chetan SoodH-Index: 4
Last. Gregory B. MelikyanH-Index: 23
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#1Yen-Cheng Chen (Emory University)H-Index: 3
#2Chetan Sood (Emory University)H-Index: 4
Last. Robert M. Dickson (Georgia Institute of Technology)H-Index: 38
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Live cell fluorescence imaging is the method of choice for studying dynamic processes, such as nuclear transport, vesicular trafficking, and virus entry and egress. However, endogenous cellular autofluorescence masks a useful fluorescence signal, limiting the ability to reliably visualize low-abundance fluorescent proteins. Here, we employed synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe), which optically alters ground versus photophysical dark state populations within fluorescent p...
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#2Akatsuki SaitoH-Index: 14
Last. Masahiro YamashitaH-Index: 22
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#1Pratibha C. Koneru (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 4
#2Ashwanth C. Francis (Emory University)H-Index: 5
Last. Mamuka Kvaratskhelia (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 34
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HIV-1 inserts its genetic code into human genomes, turning healthy cells into virus factories. To do this, the virus uses an enzyme called integrase. Front-line treatments against HIV-1 called “integrase strand-transfer inhibitors” stop this enzyme from working. These inhibitors have helped to revolutionize the treatment of HIV/AIDS by protecting the cells from new infections. But, the emergence of drug resistance remains a serious problem. As the virus evolves, it changes the shape of its integ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Pratibha C. Koneru (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 4
#2Ashwanth C. Francis (Emory University)H-Index: 5
Last. Mamuka Kvaratskhelia (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 34
view all 15 authors...
Source
#1Yen-Cheng ChenH-Index: 1
#2Chetan SoodH-Index: 4
Last. Gregory B. MelikyanH-Index: 23
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#1Mariana MarinH-Index: 18
Last. Gregory B. MelikyanH-Index: 23
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The HIV-1 entry pathway into permissive cells has been a subject of debate. Accumulating evidence, including our previous single virus tracking results, suggests that HIV-1 can enter different cell types via endocytosis and CD4/coreceptor-dependent fusion with endosomes. However, recent studies that employed indirect techniques to infer the sites of HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells have concluded that endocytosis does not contribute to infection. To assess whether HIV-1 enters these cells via endoc...
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#1Krishna C. Suddala (Emory University)H-Index: 8
#2Christine C. Lee (Emory University)H-Index: 1
Last. Gregory B. Melikyan (Emory University)H-Index: 23
view all 9 authors...
Late endosome-resident interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) inhibits fusion of diverse viruses, including Influenza A virus (IAV), by a poorly understood mechanism. Despite the broad antiviral activity of IFITM3, viruses like Lassa virus (LASV), are fully resistant to its inhibitory effects. It is currently unclear whether resistance arises from a highly efficient fusion machinery that is capable of overcoming IFITM3 restriction or the ability to enter from cellular sites devoid o...
3 CitationsSource
Live-cell imaging of single HIV-1 entry offers a unique opportunity to delineate the spatio-temporal regulation of infection. Novel virus labeling and imaging approaches enable the visualization of key steps of HIV-1 entry leading to nuclear import, integration into the host genome, and viral protein expression. Here, we discuss single virus imaging strategies, focusing on live-cell imaging of single virus fusion and productive uncoating that culminates in HIV-1 infection.
6 CitationsSource
#1Ashwanth C. Francis (Emory University)H-Index: 5
#2Gregory B. Melikyan (Emory University)H-Index: 23
Summary The HIV-1 core consists of capsid proteins (CA) surrounding viral genomic RNA. After virus-cell fusion, the core enters the cytoplasm and the capsid shell is lost through uncoating. CA loss precedes nuclear import and HIV integration into the host genome, but the timing and location of uncoating remain unclear. By visualizing single HIV-1 infection, we find that CA is required for core docking at the nuclear envelope (NE), whereas early uncoating in the cytoplasm promotes proteasomal deg...
20 CitationsSource
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