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Kate E. Jones
University College London
126Publications
40H-index
12.7kCitations
Publications 130
Newest
#1David W. Redding (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 15
#2Peter M. Atkinson (Lancaster University)H-Index: 55
Last.Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
view all 7 authors...
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#1Veronica Zamora-Gutierrez (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 6
#2Tatsuya Amano (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 25
Last.Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
Biases in data availability have serious consequences on scientific inferences that can be derived. The potential consequences of these biases could be more detrimental in the less-studied megadiverse regions, often characterized by high biodiversity and serious risks of human threats, as conservation and management actions could be misdirected. Here, focusing on 134 bat species in Mexico, we analyze spatial and taxonomic biases and their drivers in occurrence data; and identify priority areas f...
Source
#1David W. Redding (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 15
#2Peter M. Atkinson (Lancaster University)H-Index: 55
Last.Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
view all 7 authors...
Recent outbreaks of animal-borne emerging infectious diseases have likely been precipitated by a complex interplay of changing ecological, epidemiological and socio-economic factors. Here, we develop modelling methods that capture elements of each of these factors, to predict the risk of Ebola virus disease (EVD) across time and space. Our modelling results match previously-observed outbreak patterns with high accuracy, and suggest further outbreaks could occur across most of West and Central Af...
Source
#1David W. ReddingH-Index: 15
#2Peter M. AtkinsonH-Index: 55
Last.Kate E. JonesH-Index: 40
view all 7 authors...
#1David W. ReddingH-Index: 15
#2Peter M. AtkinsonH-Index: 55
Last.Kate E. JonesH-Index: 40
view all 7 authors...
The original version of the published article had an error in the abstract, which originally stated “yield a fourfold higher likelihood of epidemics”. This has been corrected to “yield a 1.63-fold higher likelihood of epidemics”.
Source
#1Richard G. A. Feachem (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 41
#2Ingrid Chen (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 14
view all 41 authors...
11 CitationsSource
#1Lydia H. V. Franklinos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
#2Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
Last.Ibrahim Abubakar (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 55
view all 4 authors...
Summary More than 80% of the global population is at risk of a vector-borne disease, with mosquito-borne diseases being the largest contributor to human vector-borne disease burden. Although many global processes, such as land-use and socioeconomic change, are thought to affect mosquito-borne disease dynamics, research to date has strongly focused on the role of climate change. Here, we show, through a review of contemporary modelling studies, that no consensus on how future changes in climatic ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mikaël J.A. Maes (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
#2Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
Last.Ben Milligan (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Global urbanisation has increased pressures on ecosystems located within city boundaries, resulting in loss and fragmentation of urban ecosystems. In September 2015, the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 SDG targets. It made environmental sustainability a key component of the agenda, whose preamble recognises that social and economic development depends on the sustainable management of Earth’...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rory Gibb (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 4
#2Ella Browning (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last.Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
1. High-throughput environmental sensing technologies are increasingly central to global monitoring of the ecological impacts of human activities. In particular, the recent boom in passive acoustic sensors has provided efficient, noninvasive, and taxonomically broad means to study wildlife populations and communities, and monitor their responses to environmental change. However, until recently, tech-nological costs and constraints have largely confined research in passive acoustic monitoring (PA...
16 CitationsSource
#1Alison J. Fairbrass (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
#2Michael Firman (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 5
Last.Kate E. Jones (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
view all 6 authors...
Cities support unique and valuable ecological communities, but understanding urban wildlife is limited due to the difficulties of assessing biodiversity. Ecoacoustic surveying is a useful way of assessing habitats, where biotic sound measured from audio recordings is used as a proxy for population abundance and/or activity. However, existing algorithms systematically over and underestimate measures of biotic activity in the presence of typical urban non-biotic sounds in recordings. We develop Ci...
4 CitationsSource
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