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Marcus Mayorga
University of Oregon
SociologyPsychologyPerceptionAffect (psychology)Social psychology
14Publications
5H-index
125Citations
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Publications 14
Newest
#1Enrico Rubaltelli (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 12
#2Dorina Hysenbelli (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 3
Last. Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 114
view all 5 authors...
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#1Christopher D. Wirz (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 5
#2Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
Last. Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
The objective of this study is to better understand the effects of media attention on Americans’ perceptions of risk by analyzing the different media sources and outlets, or “repertoires,” reported...
Source
#1Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 24
#2Brendon Swedlow (NIU: Northern Illinois University)H-Index: 13
Last. Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
AbstractTwo survey approaches to measuring cultural effects on risk views have been developed, both informed by the grid/group approach of Douglas and Wildavsky, well known to many risk analysts. U...
1 CitationsSource
#1Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
#2Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 24
Longitudinal studies of dynamics of concern and judged risk for hazards have been rare, but can offer fresh insights. Four of five surveys of an American panel over five months provided data to test the relationship of diverse factors with concern and judged risk for self/family, the nation, and the world regarding Ebola, both at baseline and in trends for individuals. The initial survey in early December 2014 followed by three weeks the second and last death from Ebola in the U.S., whereas medi...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alexander Garinther (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 1
#2Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
Last. Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 114
view all 4 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Scott R. Maier (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 6
#2Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 114
Last. Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Drawing from psychological research, the study examines how story form influences reader reaction to news accounts of mass violence in Africa. An online survey with embedded experimental conditions was administered to a US Internet panel (n = 638). Results show that how the story is told affects reader emotional response and, indirectly, charitable giving. Story personification had the strongest influence, followed by stories with photographic images. Use of statistical and mobilizing informatio...
12 CitationsSource
#1Scott R. MaierH-Index: 6
#2Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
Last. Paul SlovicH-Index: 114
view all 3 authors...
Using an online survey with embedded experimental conditions, the study examines gender and generational differences in reader reaction to news reports of mass violence in Africa. Affective response from women was found stronger than for men on 9 of 10 measures of emotion. But the gender gap disappears when the story is personalized. Depending on story framing, older readers tended to express greater affective response than millennials.
Source
#1Nathan F. Dieckmann (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 20
#2Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 24
Last. Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 114
view all 6 authors...
Expert disputes can present laypeople with several challenges including trying to understand why such disputes occur. In an online survey of the US public, we used a psychometric approach to elicit perceptions of expert disputes for 56 forecasts sampled from seven domains. People with low education, or with low self-reported topic knowledge, were most likely to attribute disputes to expert incompetence. People with higher self-reported knowledge tended to attribute disputes to expert bias due to...
20 CitationsSource
12