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Marcus Mayorga
University of Oregon
9Publications
5H-index
98Citations
Publications 11
Newest
AbstractTwo survey approaches to measuring cultural effects on risk views have been developed, both informed by the grid/group approach of Douglas and Wildavsky, well known to many risk analysts. U...
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#1Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
#2Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 23
1 CitationsSource
#1Alexander Garinther (UO: University of Oregon)
#2Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
Last.Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 109
view all 4 authors...
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#1Scott R. Maier (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 6
#2Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 109
Last.Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Drawing from psychological research, the study examines how story form influences reader reaction to news accounts of mass violence in Africa. An online survey with embedded experimental conditions was administered to a US Internet panel (n = 638). Results show that how the story is told affects reader emotional response and, indirectly, charitable giving. Story personification had the strongest influence, followed by stories with photographic images. Use of statistical and mobilizing informatio...
9 CitationsSource
#1Scott R. MaierH-Index: 6
#2Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
Last.Paul SlovicH-Index: 109
view all 3 authors...
Using an online survey with embedded experimental conditions, the study examines gender and generational differences in reader reaction to news reports of mass violence in Africa. Affective response from women was found stronger than for men on 9 of 10 measures of emotion. But the gender gap disappears when the story is personalized. Depending on story framing, older readers tended to express greater affective response than millennials.
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#1Nathan F. Dieckmann (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 17
#2Branden B. JohnsonH-Index: 23
Last.Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 109
view all 6 authors...
Expert disputes can present laypeople with several challenges including trying to understand why such disputes occur. In an online survey of the US public, we used a psychometric approach to elicit perceptions of expert disputes for 56 forecasts sampled from seven domains. People with low education, or with low self-reported topic knowledge, were most likely to attribute disputes to expert incompetence. People with higher self-reported knowledge tended to attribute disputes to expert bias due to...
16 CitationsSource
#1Bobi Ivanov (UK: University of Kentucky)H-Index: 8
#2William J. BurnsH-Index: 13
Last.Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACTThis investigation tested the effectiveness of inoculation as a pre-crisis strategy in combating the effects of politically motivated violent acts. A four-phase experiment was conducted involving 355 national consumer panel participants. The findings indicate that inoculation can be an effective pre-crisis message strategy as it was successful in enhancing public beliefs in the ability of government agencies to prevent, and minimize the effects of, violent acts. This strategy also create...
5 CitationsSource
#1Scott R. MaierH-Index: 6
#2Paul SlovicH-Index: 109
Last.Marcus MayorgaH-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
#1Daniel Västfjäll (Linköping University)H-Index: 31
#2Paul Slovic (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 109
Last.Marcus Mayorga (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of “not helping all”? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of “pseudoinefficacy”...
17 CitationsSource
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