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Catherine Stainton
University of Pittsburgh
7Publications
6H-index
228Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Mariana Achugar (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 9
#2Catherine Stainton (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 6
History is a language-based discipline. In this discipline, language plays a central role in understanding, reasoning, and explanation. Doing history entails engaging in close reading and evaluation of particular texts, reading across texts to establish intertextual links, constructing meaning by juxtaposing a series of texts, and writing arguments to support a particular interpretation of events, structures, themes, or metasystems (Leinhardt, Stainton, Virji, & Odoroff, 1994, Cognitive and inst...
#1Judith McQuaide (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 2
#2Gaea Leinhardt (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 36
Last.Catherine Stainton (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 6
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We examined high school students' ethical reasoning in the context of their participation in a computer simulation of a workplace environment in order to determine whether such simulations can prompt students to think in more complex ways about ethical issues in the world of work. Students approach the world of work with information based both on their personal experience and on opportunities they have to learn about the workplace in school. In both contexts they are exposed, albeit obliquely, t...
Abstract Seventh-grade students constructed maps in two ways. Some made maps individually and others constructed maps collaboratively in small groups. Post-test results on a written geography test indicated that students who worked in small groups had a slightly better understanding of map concepts than those who worked individually. Within the collaborative setting it was found that the groups who gained more on the geography test spent more time talking about core map concepts and more time pl...
#1Madeleine Gregg (UA: University of Alabama)H-Index: 12
#2Catherine StaintonH-Index: 6
Last.Gaea LeinhardtH-Index: 36
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This study used protocol analysis to find differences in strategy use and reasoning among five groups of subjects who were given a blank map of the United States and asked to locate states. The subjects were both children (in 5th and 11th grades) and adults (3 levels of education). For all subjects, boundaries influenced the recall, with land‐water boundaries most salient and states located along a national boundary more memorable than states bounded only by other states. Three phases of geograp...
#1Gaea LeinhardtH-Index: 36
#2Catherine StaintonH-Index: 6
Last.Salim M. VirjiH-Index: 2
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In this article, we briefly sketch out the four strands of our program of research: the nature of history classes; historical reasoning and thinking in discourse and writing; other dimensions of history; and the thinking, reasoning, and discussion of both students and historians. We then focus on one particular aspect: What is history? We discuss the definitions of history offered by published historians, two high school history teachers, and practicing historians. By contrasting the core elemen...
#1Gaea LeinhardtH-Index: 36
#2Isabel L. BeckH-Index: 1
Last.Catherine StaintonH-Index: 6
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Contents: Preface. M.G. McKeown, I.L. Beck, Making Sense of Accounts of History: Why Young Students Don't and How They Might. O. Hallden, On the Paradox of Understanding History in an Educational Setting. M.A. Britt, J-F. Rouet, M.C. Georgi, C.A. Perfetti, Learning from History Texts: From Causal Analysis to Argument Models. S.S. Wineburg, The Cognitive Representation of Historical Texts. S. Greene, Students as Authors in the Study of History. R.W. Evans, Educational Ideologies and the Teaching ...
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