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Samuel H. Preston
University of Pennsylvania
288Publications
52H-index
10.8kCitations
Publications 288
Newest
#1Yana C. Vierboom (MPG: Max Planck Society)
#2Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
Last.Arun S Hendi (Office of Population Research)H-Index: 3
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Abstract Objectives To examine trends in inequality in life expectancy and age-specific death rates across 40 US spatial units from 1990 to 2016. Methods We use multiple cause-of-death data from vital statistics to estimate measures of inequality in mortality across metropolitan status and geographic region. We consider trends for 5-year age intervals and examine inequality in cause-specific mortality. Results For both sexes, spatial inequality in life expectancy and all-cause mortality above ag...
#1Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
#2Jason M. Collins (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
Last.JoAnn E. Manson (Harvard University)H-Index: 232
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OBJECTIVE Understanding how changes in weight over the life course shape risk for diabetes is critical for the prevention of diabetes. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we investigated the association between self-reported weight change from young adulthood to midlife and incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We categorized individuals into four weight-change groups: those who remained nonobese (stable nonobese), those who moved from an obese...
#1Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
#2Daesung Choi (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
Last.Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
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ABSTRACTWe investigated the impact of diabetes on US life expectancy by sex and race/ethnicity using a prospective cohort study design. Cohorts were drawn from 1997 to 2009 waves of the National Health Interview Survey and linked to death records through December 31, 2011. We combined data on the prevalence of diabetes among decedents with estimates of the hazard ratios of individuals diagnosed with diabetes to calculate population attributable fractions (PAFs) by age, sex, and race/ethnicity at...
#1Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
#2Yana C. Vierboom (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 1
Last.Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
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Recent studies have described a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality. The pace of improvement is also slow by international standards. This paper attempts to identify the extent to which rising body mass index (BMI) is responsible for reductions in the rate of mortality improvement in the United States. The data for this study were obtained from subsequent cohorts of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988–1994; NHANES continuous, 1999–2010) a...
#1Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
#2Yu Ni (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
Last.Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
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Introduction Estimates of obesity prevalence based on current BMI are an important but incomplete indicator of the total effects of obesity on a population. Methods In this study, data on current BMI and maximum BMI were used to estimate prevalence and trends in lifetime obesity status, defined using the categories never (maximum BMI ≤30 kg/m 2 ), former (maximum BMI ≥30 kg/m 2 and current BMI ≤30 kg/m 2 ), and current obesity (current BMI ≥30 kg/m 2 ). Prevalence was estimated for the period 20...
#1Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
#2Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
Abstract Objective We assessed the contribution of increasing adiposity to the rising prevalence of diabetes in the United States over the period 1988–2014. Research design and methods Data from NHANES III (1988–1994) and continuous waves (1999–2014) were pooled for the current study. Diabetes status was assessed using data on Hemoglobin A1c. We estimated a multivariable logistic regression model that predicted the odds of having diabetes as a function of age, sex, racial/ethnic group, education...
#1Irma T. Elo (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 34
#2Neil Mehta (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 22
Last.Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
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#1Andrew Stokes (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 15
#2Samuel H. Preston (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 52
Objective The goal of this research was to identify the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes in the United States. Research Design and Methods We estimated population attributable fractions (PAF) for cohorts aged 30–84 who were surveyed in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) between 1997 and 2009 (N = 282,322) and in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2010 (N = 21,814). Cohort members were followed prospectively for mortality through 201...
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