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Richard C. Connor
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
EcologyBottlenose dolphinCetaceaAllianceBiology
78Publications
41H-index
7,340Citations
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Publications 81
Newest
#1O. O'Brien (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)
#2Simon J. Allen (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 22
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
Individuals and groups within the same population may differ in their use of resources. Also referred to as niche specialization, such differences can be documented through direct or indirect observation of resource or habitat use. Here, we examined selective habitat use in alliance-forming male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops aduncus, in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Using 6 years of sighting data (2001–2006), we calculated the home ranges of 17 male alliances (comprising 3–14 indivi...
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#1Bronte L. Moore (UWA: University of Western Australia)
#2Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
Last. Stephanie L. King (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Synchronous displays are hallmarks of many animal societies, ranging from the pulsing flashes of fireflies, to military marching in humans. Such displays are known to facilitate mate attraction or signal relationship quality. Across many taxa, synchronous male displays appear to be driven by competition, while synchronous displays in humans are thought to be unique in that they serve a cooperative function. Indeed, it is well established that human synchrony promotes cooperative endeavours and i...
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#1Laura M. McCue (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 1
#2William R. Cioffi (Duke University)H-Index: 2
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
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1 CitationsSource
#1Livia Gerber (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 3
#2Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
Last. Michael Krützen (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 33
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Male alliances are an intriguing phenomenon in the context of reproduction since, in most taxa, males compete over an indivisible resource, female fertilization. Adult male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Shark Bay, Western Australia, form long-term, multilevel alliances to sequester estrus females. These alliances are therefore critical to male reproductive success. Yet, the long-term processes leading to the formation of such complex social bonds are still poorly understood. To ident...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca A. Hamilton (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 1
#2Teresa Borcuch (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 1
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
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Coalitions and alliances exemplify the core elements of conflict and cooperation in animal societies. Ecological influences on alliance formation are more readily attributed to within-species variation where phylogenetic signals are muted. Remarkably, male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, exhibit systematic spatial variation in alliance behavior, not simply within a species or population, but within a single social network. Moving SE-NW along Peron Peninsula in S...
2 CitationsSource
#1Stephanie L. King (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 9
#2Simon J. Allen (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 22
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
Coercive mate guarding, where males use aggression to control female movements, is a form of sexual coercion which functions to constrain female mate choice. Non-human primates, for example, herd females to keep them away from competing males, but male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) also herd females to keep them close to their alliance partners. Indeed, pairs and trios of male dolphins work together to sequester single estrus females and defend them from competing alliances. Yet how mal...
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#1M. R. Bizzozzero (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 1
#2Simon J. Allen (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 22
Last. Michael Krützen (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
Homophilous behaviour plays a central role in the formation of human friendships. Individuals form social ties with others that show similar phenotypic traits, independently of relatedness. Evidenc...
2 CitationsSource
#1M. R. BizzozzeroH-Index: 1
#2Simon J. AllenH-Index: 22
Last. Michael KrützenH-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
Source
#1M. R. BizzozzeroH-Index: 1
#2Simon J. AllenH-Index: 22
Last. Michael KrützenH-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
Content: 1. Data Restrictions / 2. Ethogramm / 3. Activity Budget / 4. Social Network Structure / 5. MRQAP-DSP including all males / 6. Definition of alliances / 7. Laboratory procedures and genetic data analysis
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#1Oliver Manlik (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Michael Krützen (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 33
Last. William B. Sherwin (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 31
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Genetic diversity is essential for populations to adapt to changing environments. Measures of genetic diversity are often based on selectively neutral markers, such as microsatellites. Genetic diversity to guide conservation management, however, is better reflected by adaptive markers, including genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our aim was to assess MHC and neutral genetic diversity in two contrasting bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) populations in Western Australia-one ...
1 CitationsSource
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