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David B. Evans
World Health Organization
DiseaseHealth policyMedicineDeveloping countryEnvironmental health
288Publications
43H-index
12.3kCitations
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Publications 289
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#1Dean T. Jamison (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 50
#2Lawrence H. Suimners (Harvard University)H-Index: 86
Last. Gavin Yamey (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 22
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Prompted by the 20th anniversary of the 1993 World Development Report, a Lancet Commission revisited the case for investment in health and developed a new investment framework to achieve dramatic health gains by 2035. The Commission's report has four key messages, each accompanied by opportunities for action by national governments of low-income and middle-income countries and by the international community. First, there is an enormous economic payoff from investing in health. The impressive ret...
4 CitationsSource
#1Marie-Paule Kieny (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 26
#2David B. Evans (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 43
Last. Sowmya Kadandale (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 1
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Disease outbreaks and catastrophes can affect countries at any time, causing substantial human suffering and deaths and economic losses. If health systems are ill-equipped to deal with such situations, the affected populations can be very vulnerable.1 The current Ebola virus disease outbreak in western Africa highlights how an epidemic can proliferate rapidly and pose huge problems in the absence of a strong health system capable of a rapid and integrated response. The outbreak began in Guinea i...
74 CitationsSource
#1Ties Boerma (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 25
#2Patrick Eozenou (World Bank Group)H-Index: 10
Last. Adam Wag (World Bank Group)H-Index: 63
view all 6 authors...
Universal health coverage (UHC) has been defined as the desired outcome of health system performance whereby all people who need health services (promotion, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation) receive them, without undue financial hardship. UHC has two interrelated components: the full spectrum of good-quality, essential health services according to need, and protection from financial hardship, including possible impoverishment, due to out-of-pocket payments for health service...
89 CitationsSource
#1Ties Boerma (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 25
#2Carla AbouZahrH-Index: 15
Last. Timothy G Evans (World Bank Group)H-Index: 34
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Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all cou...
40 CitationsSource
#1Priyanka Saksena (Swiss TPH: Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute)H-Index: 6
#2Justine Hsu (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 10
Last. David B. Evans (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 43
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Financial risk protection is a key component of universal health coverage (UHC), which is defined as access to all needed quality health services without financial hardship. As part of the PLOS Medicine Collection on measurement of UHC, the aim of this paper is to examine and to compare and contrast existing measures of financial risk protection. The paper presents the rationale behind the methodologies for measuring financial risk protection and how this relates to UHC as well as some empirical...
63 CitationsSource
#1Ties BoermaH-Index: 15
#2Patrick EozenouH-Index: 10
Last. Marie-Paule KienyH-Index: 26
view all 6 authors...
Universal health coverage (UHC) has been defined as the desired outcome of health systemperformance whereby all people who need health services (promotion, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation) receive them, without undue financial hardship. UHC has two interrelated components: the full spectrum of good-quality, essential health services according to need, and protection from financial hardship, including possible impoverishment, due to out-of-pocket payments for health services...
8 Citations
The concept of universal health coverage (UHC) is now well established and understood as the aspiration that all people can obtain the quality health services they need without the risk of suffering financial hardship because of the need to pay out-of-pocket. Resolutions in the World Health Assembly (1,2), Regional Committees (3), and the UN General Assembly (4) have urged countries to develop their health and health financing systems to move closer to UHC. In the most recent World Health Assemb...
Source
#1Taghreed Adam (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 32
#2David B. Evans (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 43
Last. Christopher Margono (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 162
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Introduction Analysts estimating the costs or cost-effectiveness of health interventions requiring hospitalization often cut corners because they lack data and the costs of undertaking full step-down costing studies are high. They sometimes use the costs taken from a single hospital, sometimes use simple rules of thumb for allocating total hospital costs between general inpatient care and the outpatient department, and sometimes use the average cost of an inpatient bed-day instead of a ward-spec...
1 CitationsSource
#1Till Bärnighausen (UKZN: University of KwaZulu-Natal)H-Index: 58
#2Seth Berkley (GAVI Alliance)H-Index: 12
Last. Damian Walker (BMGF: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)H-Index: 12
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21 CitationsSource
#2Trygve OttersenH-Index: 9
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