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Jingmai K. O’Connor
Chinese Academy of Sciences
AnatomyCretaceousPaleontologyEnantiornithesBiology
98Publications
29H-index
2,083Citations
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Publications 101
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#1Han Hu (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 2
#1Han HuH-Index: 9
Last. Stephen Wroe (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 39
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Abstract We describe the detailed cranial osteology of Sapeornis chaoyangensis based on information from previously described specimens and IVPP V19058, a specimen that was recently reported with regards to the palatal elements but not fully described. The skull in this specimen is entirely preserved in disarticulation, providing the most comprehensive glimpse into the morphology of the cranial bones and their articulations for this taxon. Based on the new information extracted from this specime...
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#1Saihong Yang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
#2Huaiyu He (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 21
Last. Chenglong Deng (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 30
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The Lower Cretaceous Huajiying Formation of the Sichakou Basin in northern Hebei Province, northern China contains key vertebrate taxa of the early Jehol Biota, e.g., Protopteryx fengningensis, Archaeornithura meemannae, Peipiaosteus fengningensis, and Eoconfuciusornis zhengi. This formation arguably documents the second-oldest bird-bearing horizon, producing the oldest fossil records of the two major Mesozoic avian groups Enantiornithes and Ornithuromorpha. Hence, precisely determining the depo...
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#2Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 20
Last. Qiru Yi (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 2
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We welcome any new interpretation or alternative hypothesis regarding the taxonomic affinity of the enigmatic Oculudentavis khaungraae. However, here we demonstrate that Li et al. have failed to provide conclusive evidence for the reidentification of HPG-15-3 as a squamate. We analyse this specimen in a matrix that includes a broad sample of diapsid reptiles and resolve support for this identification only when no avian taxa are included. Regardless of whether this peculiar skull belongs to a ti...
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 20
#2Ryan C. McKellar (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 15
Last. Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 29
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Abstract All of the bird specimens previously recovered from Burmese amber have belonged to either immature specimens, or small-bodied taxa belonging to Enantiornithes. This has led to questions about whether the size bias inherent to preservation in amber has limited inclusions to smaller individuals or species, or if the avifauna of the amber-producing forest had a stronger representation of small-bodied taxa than other Cretaceous assemblages. A newly discovered inclusion of a fragmentary bird...
2 CitationsSource
#1Min Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 46
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 29
Last. Zhiheng Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
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#1Han Hu (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 2
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 29
Last. Paul G. McDonald (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 18
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Bohaiornithidae is currently the most diverse recognized family of Early Cretaceous enantiornithines, with unique morphology of the rostrum and pedal digits. Here we describe a second specimen of t...
1 CitationsSource
#1Min WangH-Index: 46
Last. ZHOUZhongheH-Index: 50
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The earliest record of the Ornithuromorpha, which includes crown birds, is currently known from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota in north-eastern China. Here we describe a new ornithuromorph bird, ...
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 20
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 29
Last. Gang Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 34
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Skeletal inclusions in approximately 99-million-year-old amber from northern Myanmar provide unprecedented insights into the soft tissue and skeletal anatomy of minute fauna, which are not typically preserved in other depositional environments1–3. Among a diversity of vertebrates, seven specimens that preserve the skeletal remains of enantiornithine birds have previously been described1,4–8, all of which (including at least one seemingly mature specimen) are smaller than specimens recovered from...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jingmai O’ConnorH-Index: 1
#1Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 29
Early bird plumage is well known primarily due to numerous discoveries of specimens preserving feathers from Early Cretaceous deposits in China. Remiges and rectrices are most commonly preserved with rectrices showing the greatest variation. The long boney-tailed Jeholornis has a unique tail plumage employing two anatomically distinct rectricial pterylae serving both aerodynamic and ornamental functions. Basal pygostylians show disparate tail plumages that are reflected by differences in pygosty...
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#1Alida M. Bailleul (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 8
#2Zhiheng Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
Last. ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 50
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The avian predentary is a small skeletal structure located rostral to the paired dentaries found only in Mesozoic ornithuromorphs. The evolution and function of this enigmatic element is unknown. Skeletal tissues forming the predentary and the lower jaws in the basal ornithuromorph Yanornis martini are identified using computed-tomography, scanning electron microscopy, and histology. On the basis of these data, we propose hypotheses for the development, structure, and function of this element. T...
3 CitationsSource
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