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Jingmai K. O'Connor
Chinese Academy of Sciences
52Publications
22H-index
1,078Citations
Publications 52
Newest
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Ryan C. McKellar (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 12
Last.Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 45
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Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
#1Alida M. Bailleul (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 6
#2Jingmai K. O'Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
Last.Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
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#1Han Hu (UNE: University of New England (United States))
#2Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 4
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
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Most living birds exhibit cranial kinesis—movement between the rostrum and braincase—in which force is transferred through the palatal and jugal bars. The palate alone distinguishes the Paleognathae from the Neognathae, with cranial kinesis more developed in neognaths. Most previous palatal studies were based on 2D data and rarely incorporated data from stem birds despite great interest in their kinetic abilities. Here we reconstruct the vomer of the Early Cretaceous stem bird Sapeornis and the ...
#1Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
#2Xiaoting Zheng (LYU: Linyi University)H-Index: 15
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
view all 7 authors...
Summary Direct indicators of diet and predator-prey relationships are exceedingly rare in the fossil record [ 1 , 2 ]. However, it is through such traces that we can best understand trophic interactions in ancient ecosystems [ 3 ], confirm dietary inferences derived from skeletal morphologies [ 4 ], and clarify behavioral and ecological interpretations [ 5 ]. Here, we identify a previously unrecognized lizard species in the abdomen of a specimen of Microraptor zhaoianus , a small, volant dromaeo...
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
Last.Fuming Lei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
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Summary Recent discoveries of vertebrate remains trapped in middle Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar [ 1 , 2 ] have provided insights into the morphology of soft-tissue structures in extinct animals [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ], in particular, into the evolution and paleobiology of early birds [ 4 , 8 , 9 ]. So far, five bird specimens have been described from Burmese amber: two isolated wings, an isolated foot with wing fragment, and two partial skeletons [ 4 , 8 , 9 , 10 ]. Most of these specime...
#1Min Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
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Change history: In this Letter, it should have been acknowledged that the silhouettes of Scansoriopterygidae in Fig. 3a were modified from a sketch by Jaime Headden. The original Letter has been corrected online.
#1Anyang Ding (HKU: University of Hong Kong)
#2Michael Pittman (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 9
Last.Xing XuH-Index: 41
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ABSTRACT The Coelurosauria are a group of mostly feathered theropods that gave rise to birds, the only dinosaurs that survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event and are still found today. Between their first appearance in the Middle Jurassic up to the end Cretaceous, coelurosaurs were party to dramatic geographic changes on the Earth’s surface, including the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea, and the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. These plate tectonic events are thought to have cau...
#1Yaser Saffar Talori (THU: Tsinghua University)
#2Jing-Shan Zhao (THU: Tsinghua University)
Last.Jingmai K. O'Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
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The origin of avian flight is one of the most controversial debates in Paleontology. This paper investigates the wing performance of Caudipteryx, the most basal non-volant dinosaur with pennaceous feathered forelimbs by using modal effective mass theory. From a mechanical standpoint, the forced vibrations excited by hindlimb locomotion stimulate the movement of wings, creating a flapping-like motion in response. This shows that the origin of the avian flight stroke should lie in a completely nat...
#1Min Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 30
#2Min Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
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Powered flight evolved independently in vertebrates in the pterosaurs, birds and bats, each of which has a different configuration of the bony elements and epidermal structures that form the wings1,2. Whereas the early fossil records of pterosaurs and bats are sparse, mounting evidence (primarily from China) of feathered non-avian dinosaurs and stemward avians that derive primarily from the Middle–Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous periods has enabled the slow piecing together of the origins of...
#1Yanhong Pan (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 13
#2Wenxia Zheng (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 10
Last.Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
view all 16 authors...
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
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