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Gloria Reeves
University of Maryland, Baltimore
PsychiatryPsychologyPsychosisClinical psychologyMedicine
96Publications
18H-index
1,005Citations
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Publications 97
Newest
#1Susan dosReis (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 27
#2Laetitia A. N'Dri (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)
Last. Beverly ButlerH-Index: 1
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Objective Caregivers of a child with a coexisting cognitive/intellectual and an emotional/behavior/developmental disability have difficult decisions regarding care management options for their child. This study aimed to pilot and refine an instrument to elicit caregivers' preferences in managing their child's care needs. Methods Subjects were 38 caregivers of a child aged 21 and younger with a coexisting cognitive/intellectual and an emotional/behavior/developmental disability. A mixed-...
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#1Christoph U. Correll (Charité)H-Index: 61
#2Linmarie Sikich (Duke University)H-Index: 3
Last. Mark A. Riddle (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 59
view all 20 authors...
Antipsychotics are used for many psychiatric conditions in youth. Although developmentally inappropriate weight gain and metabolic abnormalities, which are risk factors for premature cardiovascular mortality, are especially frequent in youth, optimal strategies to reduce pediatric antipsychotic-induced overweight/obesity are unclear. The Improving Metabolic Parameters in Antipsychotic Child Treatment (IMPACT) was a randomized, parallel group, 24-week clinical trial which enrolled overweight/obes...
2 CitationsSource
#1Donald J. Hagler (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 67
#2Sean N. Hatton (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 15
Last. Anders M. Dale (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 127
view all 143 authors...
Abstract The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study is an ongoing, nationwide study of the effects of environmental influences on behavioral and brain development in adolescents. The main objective of the study is to recruit and assess over eleven thousand 9-10-year-olds and follow them over the course of 10 years to characterize normative brain and cognitive development, the many factors that influence brain development, and the effects of those factors on mental health and other o...
15 CitationsSource
#1Susan dosReisH-Index: 27
Last. C. Daniel MullinsH-Index: 16
view all 4 authors...
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Objective:Self-report screening instruments for emerging psychosis have the potential to improve early detection efforts by increasing the number of true positives among persons deemed to be at “cl...
3 CitationsSource
#1Thomas Tsuji (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)H-Index: 2
#2Peter Phalen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Last. Jason Schiffman (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)H-Index: 24
view all 10 authors...
Background:Current methods to identify people with psychosis risk involve administration of specialized tools such as the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS), but these methods...
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#1Zachary B. Millman (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)H-Index: 8
#2Keith Gallagher (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
Last. James A. Waltz (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 25
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Abnormal reward processing is thought to play an important role in the development of psychosis, but relatively few studies have examined reward prediction errors, reinforcement learning (RL), and the reward circuitry that subserves these interconnected processes among individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR) for the disorder. Here, we present behavioral and functional neuroimaging results of two experimental tasks designed to measure overlapping aspects of reward processing among indivi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Sabrina Ereshefsky (UA: University of Arizona)
#2Pamela Rakhshan (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Last. Jason Schiffman (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 24
view all 5 authors...
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#1P.J. Rakhshan Rouhakhtar (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
#2Steven C. Pitts (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)H-Index: 17
Last. Jason Schiffman (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)H-Index: 24
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Self-report screening instruments offer promise in furthering early identification of at-risk youth, yet current efforts are limited by false positive rates. Identifying moderators of accuracy is a potential step towards improving identification and prevention efforts. We investigated the moderating effect of age on self-reported attenuated positive symptoms from the Prime Screen and clinician diagnosed clinical high-risk/early psychosis (CHR/EP) status. Participants (N = 134) were raci...
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#1Gloria ReevesH-Index: 18
#2Heidi J. WehringH-Index: 18
Last. Jason SchiffmanH-Index: 3
view all 7 authors...
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