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Gloria Reeves
University of Maryland, College Park
93Publications
17H-index
889Citations
Publications 93
Newest
Published on May 16, 2019in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry1.36
Thomas Tsuji2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County),
Peter Phalen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)+ 7 AuthorsJason Schiffman24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Background:Current methods to identify people with psychosis risk involve administration of specialized tools such as the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS), but these methods have not been widely adopted. Validation of a more multipurpose assessment tool—such as the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS)—may increase the scope of identification efforts.Methods:We assessed the correspondence between SIPS-determined clinical high risk/early psycho...
Published on Jul 16, 2019in Psychiatric Services2.25
Zachary B. Millman8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Pamela Rakhshan Rouhakhtar + 7 AuthorsJason Schiffman24
Estimated H-index: 24
Objective:Self-report screening instruments for emerging psychosis have the potential to improve early detection efforts by increasing the number of true positives among persons deemed to be at “cl...
Published on May 1, 2019in Academic Pediatrics2.54
Susan dosReis27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
L N'Dri (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)+ 3 AuthorsBeverly Butler1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Objective Caregivers of a child with a coexisting cognitive/intellectual and an emotional/behavior/developmental disability have difficult decisions regarding care management options for their child. This study aimed to pilot and refine an instrument to elicit caregivers' preferences in managing their child's care needs. Methods Subjects were 38 caregivers of a child aged 21 and younger with a coexisting cognitive/intellectual and an emotional/behavior/developmental disability. A mixed-...
Published on Apr 9, 2019in Schizophrenia Bulletin7.29
Sabrina Ereshefsky (UA: University of Arizona), Pamela Rakhshan (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)+ 2 AuthorsJason Schiffman24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Schizophrenia Research4.57
Zachary B. Millman8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County),
Keith Gallagher (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)+ 10 AuthorsSamantha Redman (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Abstract Abnormal reward processing is thought to play an important role in the development of psychosis, but relatively few studies have examined reward prediction errors, reinforcement learning (RL), and the reward circuitry that subserves these interconnected processes among individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR) for the disorder. Here, we present behavioral and functional neuroimaging results of two experimental tasks designed to measure overlapping aspects of reward processing among indivi...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Psychiatry Research-neuroimaging2.21
P.J. Rakhshan Rouhakhtar (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Steven C. Pitts16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
+ 9 AuthorsScott W. Woods75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Yale University)
Abstract Self-report screening instruments offer promise in furthering early identification of at-risk youth, yet current efforts are limited by false positive rates. Identifying moderators of accuracy is a potential step towards improving identification and prevention efforts. We investigated the moderating effect of age on self-reported attenuated positive symptoms from the Prime Screen and clinician diagnosed clinical high-risk/early psychosis (CHR/EP) status. Participants ( N = 134) were rac...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Schizophrenia Research4.57
Elizabeth Thompson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County),
Pamela Rakhshan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
+ 7 AuthorsGloria Reeves17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)
Abstract Background Youth at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis often experience difficulties in social and role functioning. Given evidence that family stress and support can impact psychosis-risk symptoms, as well as an individual's ability to fulfill social and role functions, family dynamics are hypothesized to moderate the effect of psychosis-risk symptoms on functioning. Methods Participants at CHR ( N = 52) completed the clinician-administered Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk S...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Psychiatry Research-neuroimaging2.21
Peter L. Phalen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore),
Pamela Rakhshan Rouhakhtar (UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)+ 6 AuthorsJason Schiffman24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Abstract Well-validated screening tools have been developed to identify people at high risk for psychosis, but these are rarely used outside of specialty clinics or research settings. The development of extremely brief and simple screening tools could increase dissemination, especially in settings with low buy-in such as those with low base rates of psychosis and/or time constraints. We sought to identify such a brief measure by modeling participant responses to three psychosis screening questio...
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