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Cynthia C. Chang
University of Washington
EcosystemEcologyBotanyGenetic diversityBiology
19Publications
8H-index
195Citations
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Publications 19
Newest
#1Meghan L. Avolio (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 15
#2Elisabeth J. Forrestel (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 9
Last. Melinda D. Smith (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cynthia C. Chang (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 8
#2Janneke HilleRisLambers (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 29
Primary plant succession provides an excellent natural experiment to test ecological questions about community assembly following major disturbances. Temporal phylogenetic and functional trait dispersion patterns can give insight into the relative importance of stochastic and deterministic processes, as well as the potential identity of deterministic (biotic vs. abiotic) drivers (e.g. dispersal, growth, nutrient acquisition, and herbivore resistance ability). We used 28 years of plant compositio...
Source
#1Cynthia C. Chang (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 8
#2Benjamin L. Turner (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 67
Ecological succession – how biological communities re‐assemble and change over time following natural or anthropogenic disturbance – has been studied since the birth of ecology, and the resulting theoretical framework underpins many aspects of the discipline. Recently, the mechanistic basis of classic succession theory has been advanced by studies of plant and microbial interactions, functional traits, and retrogressive stages of ecosystem development. This special issue brings together a series...
3 CitationsSource
#1Cynthia C. Chang (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 8
#2Charles B. Halpern (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 35
Last. Donald B. Zobel (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 18
view all 12 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alexander Bucksch (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 16
#2Acheampong Atta-Boateng (Yale University)H-Index: 2
Last. Daniel H. Chitwood (Donald Danforth Plant Science Center)H-Index: 25
view all 37 authors...
The geometries and topologies of leaves, flowers, roots, shoots and their arrangements have fascinated plant biologists and mathematicians alike. As such, plant morphology is inherently mathematical in that it describes plant form and architecture with geometrical and topological techniques. Gaining an understanding of how to modify plant morphology, through molecular biology and breeding, aided by a mathematical perspective, is critical to improving agriculture, and the monitoring of ecosystems...
22 CitationsSource
#1Alexander Bucksch (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 16
#2Acheampong Atta-Boateng (Yale University)H-Index: 2
Last. Daniel H. ChitwoodH-Index: 25
view all 38 authors...
Plant morphology is inherently mathematical. The geometries of leaves and flowers and intricate topologies of the root have fascinated plant biologists and mathematicians alike. Beyond providing aesthetic inspiration, understanding plant morphology has become pressing in an era of climate change and a growing population. Gaining an understanding of how to modify plant architecture through molecular biology and breeding is critical to improving agriculture, and the monitoring of ecosystems and gl...
2 CitationsSource
#1Mathilde Balduzzi (IRIA: French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation)H-Index: 2
#2Brad M. Binder (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 30
Last. Erin E. Sparks (Duke University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
An emerging challenge in plant biology is to develop qualitative and quantitative measures to describe the appearance of plants through the integration of mathematics and biology. A major hurdle in developing these metrics is finding common terminology across fields. In this review, we define approaches for analyzing plant geometry, topology, and shape, and provide examples for how these terms have been and can be applied to plants. In leaf morphological quantifications both geometry and shape h...
19 CitationsSource
#1Cynthia C. Chang (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 8
#2Janneke HilleRisLambers (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 29
Succession and community assembly research overlap in many respects, such as through their focus on how ecological processes like dispersal, environmental filters, and biotic interactions influence community structure. Indeed, many recent advances have been made by successional studies that draw on modern analytical techniques introduced by contemporary community assembly studies. However, community assembly studies generally lack a temporal perspective, both on how the forces structuring commun...
14 CitationsSource
#1Sally E. Koerner (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 16
#2Meghan L. AvolioH-Index: 15
Last. Melinda D. Smith (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Summary 1. Global change is increasing the frequency and magnitude of resource fluctuations (pulses) at multiple time-scales. According to the fluctuating resource availability hypothesis (FRAH), susceptibility of an ecosystem to invasion (i.e. invasibility) is expected to increase whenever resource supply exceeds that which is utilized by native communities. Thus, global change has the potential to increase invasibility around the world. 2. Here, we test the FRAH by adding seeds of a target inv...
7 CitationsSource
#1Meghan L. Avolio (Yale University)H-Index: 15
#2Cynthia C. Chang (Yale University)H-Index: 8
Last. Melinda D. Smith (CSU: Colorado State University)H-Index: 46
view all 4 authors...
Background: The genetic diversity within populations has been shown to affect ecosystem functions, including productivity and invasion resistance. To date most experiments have focused on manipulation of genotypic richness and have ignored other measures of genetic diversity.Aims: In the present study we aimed to establish whether manipulated genotypic richness and genomic dissimilarity of Andropogon gerardii affect productivity and invasion resistance.Methods: We created experimental mesocosms ...
5 CitationsSource
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