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Peter Cappelli
University of Pennsylvania
BusinessLabour economicsEconomicsManagementPublic relations
146Publications
41H-index
6,503Citations
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Publications 139
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#1Liat Eldor (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 7
#2Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
The use of agency temps in the workplace has been the subject of considerable research interest, much of it focused on the effects that using temps have on the job attitudes of regular employees. W...
Source
#1Rocio Bonet (IE University)H-Index: 5
#2Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
Last. Monika Hamori (IE University)H-Index: 10
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Research summary We examine the advancement of women in executive roles in the ranks of the 10 highest executive positions in the Fortune 100 companies in 2001 and 2011. We find that women executives secured top executive positions faster than men, controlling for relevant individual attributes, and that the advantage of women with respect to men grew with the number of years they spent in the organization. The female advantage disappeared once companies had more than one high‐ranking female exe...
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#1Prasanna Tambe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
#2Xuan Ye (BC: Boston College)
Last. Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
view all 3 authors...
We test the hypothesis that IT workers accept a compensating differential to work with emerging IT systems, and that employers that invest in these systems can, in turn, capture greater value from the wages they pay. We show that much of the utility IT workers derive from these systems is from skills acquired on the job. This is principally true for younger workers at employers where skill development is encouraged, and the effects are stronger in thicker markets where workers with newer skills ...
Source
#1Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
ABSTRACTI consider the evidence about the return to the cost of a college degree based on research from the US. Many countries, including the UK, are increasing the share of college costs paid for ...
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#1Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
#2Prasanna Tambe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
Last. Valery Yakubovich (ESSEC Business School)H-Index: 7
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Discussions about the potential for artificial intelligence (AI) in modern society have ranged across virtually every aspect of human endeavors. At least at present, general-purpose artificial intelligence remains quite distant. The best prospects lie in developing evidence-based algorithms to aid decisions especially in those situations where human judgment is now dominant. Peter Cappelli, Prasand Tambe, and Valery Yakubovich consider the possibilities for data science-based algorithms in one a...
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#1Peter CappelliH-Index: 41
#2Martin J. ConyonH-Index: 38
Last. David Almeda (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 1
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The authors assert that broad-based stock options create a social exchange relationship between the employer and employees, leading to higher individual job performance in the next period. They com...
2 CitationsSource
#1Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
#2Prasanna Tambe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
Last. Valery Yakubovich (ESSEC Business School)H-Index: 7
view all 3 authors...
There is a substantial gap between the promise and reality of artificial intelligence in human resource (HR) management. This article identifies four challenges in using data science techniques for...
4 CitationsSource
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#1Michael UseemH-Index: 22
#2Harbir SinghH-Index: 43
view all 6 authors...
#1Prasanna Tambe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
#2Xuan Ye (BC: Boston College)
Last. Peter Cappelli (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
view all 3 authors...
We test the hypothesis that IT workers accept a compensating differential to work with emerging IT systems, and that employers that invest in these systems can, in turn, capture greater value from the wages they pay. We show that much of the utility IT workers derive from these systems is from skills acquired on the job. This is principally true for younger workers at employers where skill development is encouraged, and the effects are stronger in thicker markets where workers with newer skills ...
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