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Spencer M. Ross
University of Massachusetts Lowell
15Publications
4H-index
152Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Sommer KapitanH-Index: 5
#2Spencer M. RossH-Index: 4
Last.David H. SilveraH-Index: 19
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#1Spencer M. Ross (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 4
Past research has found that students and instructors may be disaffected with many of the most widely used learning management systems (LMS). Other research has found that Millennials and post-Mill...
1 CitationsSource
#1Spencer M. Ross (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 4
#2Sommer Kapitan (AUT: Auckland University of Technology)H-Index: 5
Purpose This work aims to use equity theory to explore how consumers assess prosocial actions as part of a mental portfolio of purchases and behaviors in a broader marketplace, seeking balance in market exchanges. Conceptualizing marketing exchange as both an exchange of perceived value and a balance between self- and collective-interest allows for segmentation by consumer sensitivity to equity and sheds light on why prosocial consumption might occur. Design/methodology/approach Two studies vali...
2 CitationsSource
#1Spencer M. Ross (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 4
#2Paula Dootson (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 3
A number of theories explain why consumers engage in behaviors consistent with their attitudes. We question whether strong consumer attitudes always align with motivations and that the absence of motivation may subvert intention. Disconnects between attitudes and behaviors may actually be the result of pathological apathy (Marin, Am J Psychiatry 147:22–30, 1990; Radakovic and Abrahams, Psychiatry Res 219:658–663, 2014)—or the absence of an individual’s motivation—decreasing intentions. A pilot s...
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#1Spencer M. Ross (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 4
#2Lauren I. Labrecque (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 11
While the promise of holograms to create a replicable consumer experience excites some consumers, others express skepticism about the potential enjoyment of watching dead celebrities, fictional characters, and so forth, in a materially “real” environment (Giesler, 2004). Virtual and augmented realities have acted as consumer gateways to consumer-hologram interactions (Jin, 2009; Suh & Lee, 2005; Yaoyuneyong et al., 2015); however, little is known about the state of these interactions. Although M...
1 CitationsSource
#1Spencer M. Ross (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 4
The brand-brand dyad is increasingly becoming a holistic interbrand relationship; we define these interbrand relationships as consisting not only of traditional, tangible value created through strategic brand alliances/co-branding/brand extensions (Park et al. 1996; Rao and Ruekert 1994; Simonin and Ruth 1998) but also of nontraditional, intangible value created through interbrand communications. Social media has deepened and broadened marketplace relationships beyond brand-consumer relationship...
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#1Shalini Bahl (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
#2George R. Milne (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 33
Last.Sabine Boesen-MarianiH-Index: 1
view all 13 authors...
AbstractThe authors propose that mindfulness is an antidote to mindless consumption, which adversely affects individual and collective well-being. The concept of mindfulness is explained and applied to the consumption context. More specifically, the authors examine mindful consumption as an ongoing practice of bringing attention, with acceptance, to inner and outer stimuli, and the effects of this practice on the consumption process. The transformative potential of mindful consumption is reviewe...
27 CitationsSource
#1Spencer M. RossH-Index: 4
#2Fatima Hajjat (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 2
Prior research on communications of strategic brand alliances assesses spillover effects of these alliances on consumer attitudes toward brands (Simonin and Ruth 1998; Baumgarth 2004). However, social media strategies have shifted firms’ months-long bureaucratic approval processes of formal alliances to real-time brand-to-brand communications, or interbrand communications (IBCs). This has given firms the ability to co-create brand value, alongside consumer value co-creation. The purpose of this ...
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#1Spencer M. RossH-Index: 4
#2Lauren I. LabrecqueH-Index: 11
For experiential marketers or for service providers, holographic technology implies labor cost-savings, standardizing customer interaction, and potential revenue opportunities through simultaneous experiential replication. The novelty of holograms has encouraged businesses to rapidly adopt their use, however, little is known about consumers’ reactions to and interactions with virtually-replicated experiential consumption. In this paper, we propose and test a model of how holographic experiences ...
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#1Spencer M. RossH-Index: 4
Some products and services offered in marketing are prosocial, forcing consumers to consider their prosocial attributes in the decision making process. Definitions of prosocial consumption include a variety of complex issues beyond those focused on by popular culture (Devinney, Auger, and Eckhardt 2010; Peloza and Shang 2011). For marketers, these prosocial issues may broadly fall under three macro level pillars of strategic sustainability: economic, social, and environmental (Sheth, Sethia, and...
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