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Steven B. Heymsfield
Pennington Biomedical Research Center
EndocrinologyPopulationObesityDiabetes mellitusMedicine
59Publications
17H-index
1,567Citations
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Publications 43
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#1Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
#2Phoenix Hwaung (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 4
Last. John M. Schuna (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 18
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OBJECTIVES: The scaling of structural components to body size is well studied in mammals, although comparable human observations in a large and diverse sample are lacking. The current study aimed to fill this gap by examining the scaling relationships between total body (TB) and regional bone and skeletal muscle (SM) mass with body size, as defined by stature, in a nationally representative sample of the US population. METHODS: Subjects were 17,126 non-Hispanic (NH) white, NH black, and Mexican ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
#2Diana M. Thomas (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 7
Last. Manfred J. Müller (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 45
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Body mass in humans and animals is strongly associated with the rate of heat production as defined by resting energy expenditure (REE). Beginning with the ancient Greeks up to the present time, philosophers and scientists have endeavored to understand the nature and sources of bodily heat. Today we recognize that body mass consists of organs and tissues, each of which produces a specified amount of heat at rest. An individual organ’s REE can now be estimated in vivo as the product of its assumed...
2 CitationsSource
#1Brianna Bourgeois (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 6
#2Bo Fan (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 31
Last. Steven B. Heymsfield (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 17
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BACKGROUND: Measures of skeletal muscle function decline at a faster rate with ageing than do indices of skeletal muscle mass. These observations have been attributed to age-related changes in muscle quality, another functional determinant separate from skeletal muscle mass. This study tested the hypothesis that improved predictions of skeletal muscle strength can be accomplished by combining clinically available measures of skeletal muscle mass and quality. METHODS: The participants included 14...
4 CitationsSource
#1James Pleuss (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 2
#2Kevin Talty (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 1
Last. Diana M. Thomas (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 7
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A long-standing question in nutrition and obesity research involves quantifying the relationship between body fat and anthropometry. To date, the mathematical formulation of these relationships has relied on pairing easily obtained anthropometric measurements such as the body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, or hip circumference to body fat. Recent advances in 3D body shape imaging technology provides a new opportunity for quickly and accurately obtaining hundreds of anthropometric measure...
1 CitationsSource
#1Karoline Hood (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 1
#2Jacob Ashcraft (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 1
Last. Diana M. Thomas (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 7
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Body mass index (BMI) represents a normalization of weight to height and is used to classify adiposity. While the capacity of BMI as an adiposity index has been experimentally validated in Caucasians, but there has been little testing Asian populations. To determine whether weight scales to height squared in Asian Indians across the general population and in Asian Indian tribes an allometric analysis on the power law model, W = αHβ, where W is weight (kg) and H is height (m) was performed on cro...
2 CitationsSource
#1Manfred J. Müller (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 45
#2Michael Krawczak (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 85
Last. Anja Bosy-Westphal (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 41
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Source
#1Ania M. Jastreboff (Yale University)H-Index: 14
#2Catherine M. Kotz (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 44
Last. Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
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: The emerging obesity epidemic and accompanying health consequences led The Obesity Society (TOS) in 2008 to publish a position paper defining obesity as a disease. Since then, new information has emerged on the underlying mechanisms leading to excess adiposity and the associated structural, cardiometabolic, and functional disturbances. This report presents the updated TOS 2018 position statement on obesity as a noncommunicable chronic disease.
16 CitationsSource
#1Diana M. Thomas (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 7
#2Krista Watts (USMA: United States Military Academy)H-Index: 2
Last. Dale A. Schoeller (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 81
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
#2Courtney M. Peterson (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 22
Last. Anja Bosy-Westphal (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 41
view all 8 authors...
: Humans expend energy at rest (REE), and this major energy exchange component is now usually estimated using statistical equations that include weight and other predictor variables. While these formulas are useful in evaluating an individual's or group's REE, an important gap remains: available statistical models are inadequate for explaining underlying organ-specific and tissue-specific mechanisms accounting for resting heat production. The lack of such systems level REE prediction models leav...
6 CitationsSource
#1Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
#2Courtney M. Peterson (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 22
Last. Anja Bosy-Westphal (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 41
view all 8 authors...
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