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James H. Brown
University of New Mexico
EcosystemAllometryEcologyPopulationBiology
390Publications
107H-index
55.4kCitations
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Publications 387
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#1John R. Schramski (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 13
#2C. Brock Woodson (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 9
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
view all 3 authors...
Energy fuels, and is central to, all physical and biological systems, including the human population and economy. Yet science has missed the significance of civilization’s growing energy consumption. The energetics of the global food system illustrate the counterintuitive aspects of present energy consumption circumstances.
1 CitationsSource
#1Joseph R. Burger (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 1
#1Joseph R. Burger (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 15
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
view all 4 authors...
We resurrect the metabolic life table (MLT), a combination of life table and energy budget that quantifies how metabolic energy is acquired and allocated to survival, growth and reproduction over the life cycle. To highlight its broad implications and utility, we apply this framework to John Bretts classic data on sockeye salmon. In the life cycle of Skeena River sockeye, a pair of breeders dies in fresh water after spawning, and the offspring move to the ocean where they feed, grow and suffer m...
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#1Richard M. Sibly (University of Reading)H-Index: 55
#2James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
Last. J. H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)
view all 2 authors...
Juvenile growth curves are generally sigmoid in shape: Growth is initially nearly exponential, but it slows to near zero as the animal approaches maturity. The drop‐off in growth rate is puzzling because, everything else being equal, selection favors growing as fast as possible. Existing theory posits sublinear scaling of resource acquisition with juvenile body mass and linear scaling of the requirement for maintenance, so the difference, fuel for growth, decreases as the juvenile increases in s...
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#1Joseph Robert Burger (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 1
#2Chen Hou (Missouri University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 12
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
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The life histories of animals reflect the allocation of metabolic energy to traits that determine fitness and the pace of living. Here, we extend metabolic theories to address how demography and mass–energy balance constrain allocation of biomass to survival, growth, and reproduction over a life cycle of one generation. We first present data for diverse kinds of animals showing empirical patterns of variation in life-history traits. These patterns are predicted by theory that highlights the effe...
2 CitationsSource
#1John R. Schramski (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 13
#2C. Brock Woodson (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 9
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1John R. Schramski (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 13
#2C. Brock Woodson (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 9
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
view all 5 authors...
Global food security for a population of 9 billion by 2050 depends on a complex socioeconomic and biophysical system. Current strategies involve decreasing food losses, increasing yields, and improving distribution efficiencies. Herein, we use a systems-based approach to show that contrary to a historically rising global dietary energy production (DEP: per capita calories grown or captured), food self-sufficiency at the country-level has been in a four-decade decline as the number of countries g...
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#1Joseph R. Burger (Population Research Institute)H-Index: 1
#2James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
Last. Eric D. Roy (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 11
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The urban transition, the increased ratio of urban to rural population globally and within countries, is a hallmark of the twenty-first century. Our analysis of publicly available data from the World Bank spanning several decades for ~ 195 countries shows that across and within nations over time, per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP), energy use, and CO2 emissions are lowest in predominantly rural countries (rural > urban pop.), increase rapidly across urbanizing countries (rural ≈ urban pop.)...
4 CitationsSource
#1John Grady (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 10
#2Brian S. Maitner (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 6
Last. James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
view all 13 authors...
INTRODUCTION One of the most general patterns in ecology is that diversity increases toward the equator. In the ocean, however, mammal and bird richness generally peak in colder, temperate waters. This pattern is especially puzzling given the thermal stress that cold water imposes on warm-bodied endotherms, which must maintain constant, elevated body temperatures through metabolic activity. In contrast, ectothermic fish and reptiles that rely on ambient heat to regulate their body temperature sh...
5 CitationsSource
#1James H. Brown (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 107
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#1S. K. Morgan ErnestH-Index: 29
#2Glenda M. YenniH-Index: 4
Last. Thomas J. ValoneH-Index: 37
view all 24 authors...
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