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Erika Kleiderman
McGill University
25Publications
6H-index
151Citations
Publications 27
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#1Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
#2Rachel Thompson (Swansea University)
Last.Bartha Maria Knoppers (McGill University)H-Index: 49
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ABSTRACTDoping control is an integral part of participation in sport. It aims to protect the health of athletes and to preserve the integrity and intrinsic values associated with elite sport. The W...
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#1Richard Milne (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 6
#2Katherine I. Morley (University of Melbourne)
Last.Anna Middleton (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 17
view all 17 authors...
Trust may be important in shaping public attitudes to genetics and intentions to participate in genomics research and big data initiatives. As such, we examined trust in data sharing among the gene ...
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#1Anna Middleton (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 17
#2Richard Milne (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 6
Last.Katherine I. MorleyH-Index: 30
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Public acceptance is critical for sharing of genomic data at scale. This paper examines how acceptance of data sharing pertains to the perceived similarities and differences between DNA and other forms of personal data. It explores the perceptions of representative publics from the USA, Canada, the UK and Australia (n = 8967) towards the donation of DNA and health data. Fifty-two percent of this public held ‘exceptionalist’ views about genetics (i.e., believed DNA is different or ‘special’ compa...
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#1Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
#2Vardit Ravitsky (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 15
Last.Bartha Maria Knoppers (McGill University)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
In this reply, we wish to defend our original position and address several of the points raised by two excellent responses. The first response (De Miguel Beriain) questions the relevance of the notion of ‘serious’ within the context of human germline genome modification (HGGM). We argue that the ‘serious’ factor is relevant and that there is a need for medical and social lenses to delineate the limits of acceptability and initial permissible applications of HGGM. In this way, ‘serious’ acts as a...
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#1Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
#2Ian Stedman (York University)H-Index: 1
Human germline genome editing may prove to be especially poignant for members of the rare disease community, many of whom are diagnosed with monogenic diseases. This community lacks broad representation in the literature surrounding genome editing, notably in Canada, yet is likely to be directly affected by eventual clinical applications of this technology. Although not generalizable, the literature does offer some commonalities regarding the experiences of rare disease patients. This manuscript...
2 CitationsSource
#1Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
#2Vardit Ravitsky (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 15
Last.Bartha Maria Knoppers (McGill University)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
Current advances in assisted reproductive technologies aim to promote the health and well-being of future children. They offer the possibility to select embryos with the greatest potential of being born healthy (eg, preimplantation genetic testing) and may someday correct faulty genes responsible for heritable diseases in the embryo (eg, human germline genome modification (HGGM)). Most laws and policy statements surrounding HGGM refer to the notion of ‘serious’ as a core criterion in determining...
4 CitationsSource
#1Tania Bubela (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 20
#2Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
Last.Bartha Maria Knoppers (McGill University)H-Index: 49
view all 7 authors...
Canada’s Assisted Human Reproduction Act is long overdue for Parliamentary review. We argue that the current regulation of research using human reproductive materials is not proportionate, not responsive to the uncertain threats posed to human and environmental health and safety, and is not considerate of diverse values in a democratic society. We propose tailored regulatory carve-outs for in vitro research for currently prohibited activities, such as gene editing, and for the exercise of Minist...
1 CitationsSource
#1Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
#2Ubaka Ogbogu (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 11
ABSTRACTThe announcement of the “CRISPR babies” reignited the debate surrounding the ethical, legal and social implications of germline gene editing. Despite having been conducted in the context of...
2 CitationsSource
#1Anna Middleton (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 17
#2Richard Milne (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 6
Last.Katherine I. Morley (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 30
view all 14 authors...
Abstract With the use of genetic technology, researchers have the potential to inform medical diagnoses and treatment in actionable ways. Accurate variant interpretation is a necessary condition for the utility of genetic technology to unfold. This relies on the ability to access large genomic datasets so that comparisons can be made between variants of interest. This can only be successful if DNA and medical data are donated by large numbers of people to ‘research’, including clinical, non-prof...
3 CitationsSource
#1Bartha Maria Knoppers (McGill University)H-Index: 49
#2Erika Kleiderman (McGill University)H-Index: 6
KEY POINTS The response to the announcement in China on Nov. 25, 2018, of the “first clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR] babies”[1][1] is reminiscent of that surrounding the 1978 birth by in vitro fertilization of Louise Brown, the “first test-tube baby.” Will
4 CitationsSource
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