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Leon Huynen
Griffith University
Ancient DNAGeneticsEvolutionary biologyBiologyZoology
44Publications
15H-index
1,073Citations
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Publications 44
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#1Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
#1Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
Last. David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
view all 12 authors...
The ancient catacombs of Egypt harbor millions of well-preserved mummified Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) dating from ~600BC. Although it is known that a very large number of these ‘votive’ mummies were sacrificed to the Egyptian God Thoth, how the ancient Egyptians obtained millions of these birds for mummification remains unresolved. Ancient Egyptian textual evidences suggest they may have been raised in dedicated large-scale farms. To investigate the most likely method used by the pri...
3 CitationsSource
#1Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
#2Sankar Subramanian (University of the Sunshine Coast)H-Index: 20
Last. David M. LambertH-Index: 39
view all 12 authors...
The ancient catacombs of Egypt harbor millions of well-preserved mummified Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) dating from ~600BC. Although it is known that a very large number of these votive mummies were sacrificed to the Egyptian God Thoth, how the ancient Egyptians obtained millions of these birds for mummification remains unresolved. Ancient Egyptian textual evidences suggest they may have been raised in dedicated large-scale farms. To investigate the most likely method used by the pries...
Source
#1Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
#2Leon Huynen (Griffith University)H-Index: 15
Last. David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
view all 8 authors...
The long-term preservation of DNA requires a number of optimal conditions, including consistent exposure to cool, dry, and dark environments. As a result, the successful recovery of ancient DNA from material from warmer climates such as those in Egypt has often been met with scepticism. Egypt has an abundance of ancient mummified animals and humans, whose genetic analyses would offer important insights into ancient cultural practices. To date, the retrieval of complete genomes from ancient Egypt...
2 CitationsSource
#2Leon HuynenH-Index: 15
Last. David M. LambertH-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Tim H. Heupink (Griffith University)H-Index: 9
#2Sankar Subramanian (Griffith University)H-Index: 20
Last. David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
view all 10 authors...
The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537–542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the “Out of Africa” model....
17 CitationsSource
#1Leon Huynen (Griffith University)H-Index: 15
#2David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
The successful extraction of DNA from historical or ancient animal bone is important for the analysis of discriminating genetic markers. Methods used currently rely on the digestion of bone with EDTA and proteinase K, followed by purification with phenol/chloroform and silica bed binding. We have developed a simple concentrated hydrochloric acid-based method that precludes the use of phenol/chloroform purification and can lead to a several-fold increase in DNA yield when compared to other common...
1 CitationsSource
#1Diana Le Duc (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 6
#2Gabriel Renaud (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 26
Last. Torsten Schöneberg (Leipzig University)H-Index: 49
view all 15 authors...
Background Kiwi, comprising five species from the genus Apteryx, are endangered, ground-dwelling bird species endemic to New Zealand. They are the smallest and only nocturnal representatives of the ratites. The timing of kiwi adaptation to a nocturnal niche and the genomic innovations, which shaped sensory systems and morphology to allow this adaptation, are not yet fully understood.
38 CitationsSource
#1Anne Rachel Kemp (Griffith University)H-Index: 4
#2Leon Huynen (Griffith University)H-Index: 15
Abstract Bone fragments collected from the Platypus RockShelter in southeast Queensland, on the banks of the Brisbane River, can be compared with bone from the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri , and suggest that this species, which was widely distributed in Queensland in Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits, was also found in the Brisbane River as recently as 3850 years before the present, based on current 14 C dates. The fragments have dimensions and morphology consistent with par...
4 CitationsSource
#1Sankar Subramanian (Griffith University)H-Index: 20
#2Syamala Gowri Lingala (Griffith University)H-Index: 1
Last. David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
AbstractThe complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarcticus) was sequenced and compared with other penguin mitogenomes. The genome is 15,972 bp in length with the number and order of protein coding genes and RNAs being very similar to that of other known penguin mitogenomes. Comparative nucleotide analysis showed the Chinstrap mitogenome shares 94% homology with the mitogenome of its sister species, Pygoscelis adelie (Adelie penguin). Divergence at nonsynonymous nu...
2 CitationsSource
#1Leon Huynen (Griffith University)H-Index: 15
#2B. J. Gill (Auckland War Memorial Museum)H-Index: 14
Last. David M. Lambert (Griffith University)H-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
Background: The analysis of growth in extinct organisms is difficult. The general lack of skeletal material from a range of developmental states precludes determination of growth characteristics. For New Zealand’s extinct moa we have available to us a selection of rare femora at different developmental stages that have allowed a preliminary determination of the early growth of this giant flightless bird. We use a combination of femora morphometrics, ancient DNA, and isotope analysis to provide i...
2 CitationsSource
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