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Ben A. Woodcock
University of Reading
111Publications
33H-index
3,226Citations
Publications 111
Newest
#1Gary D. PowneyH-Index: 11
#2Claire CarvellH-Index: 22
Last.Nick J. B. IsaacH-Index: 35
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Pollination is a critical ecosystem service underpinning the productivity of agricultural systems across the world. Wild insect populations provide a substantial contribution to the productivity of many crops and seed set of wild flowers. However, large-scale evidence on species-specific trends among wild pollinators are lacking. Here we show substantial inter-specific variation in pollinator trends, based on occupancy models for 353 wild bee and hoverfly species in Great Britain between 1980 an...
16 CitationsSource
#1Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 33
#2Michael P.D. Garratt (University of Reading)H-Index: 18
Last.Richard F. PywellH-Index: 42
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How insects promote crop pollination remains poorly understood in terms of the contribution of functional trait differences between species. We used meta-analyses to test for correlations between community abundance, species richness and functional trait metrics with oilseed rape yield, a globally important crop. While overall abundance is consistently important in predicting yield, functional divergence between species traits also showed a positive correlation. This result supports the compleme...
4 CitationsSource
Abstract Agricultural pesticides are a key component of the toolbox of most agricultural systems and are likely to continue to play a role in meeting the challenge of feeding a growing global population. However, pesticide use has well documented and often significant consequences for populations of native wildlife. Although rigorous, regulatory processes for the approval of new chemicals for agronomic use do have limitations which may fail to identify real-world negative effects of products. He...
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#1Arran Greenop (Lancaster University)H-Index: 2
#2Andreas CeceljaH-Index: 1
Last.Richard F. PywellH-Index: 42
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Sentinel prey (an artificially manipulated patch of prey) are widely used to assess the level of predation provided by natural enemies in agricultural systems. Whilst a number of different methodologies are currently in use, little is known about how arthropod predators respond to artificially manipulated sentinel prey in comparison with predation on free-living prey populations. We assessed how attack rates on immobilized (aphids stuck to cards) and artificial (plasticine lepidopteran larvae mi...
2 CitationsSource
#1Arran GreenopH-Index: 2
Last.Richard F. PywellH-Index: 42
view all 6 authors...
Sentinel prey (an artificially manipulated patch of prey) are widely used to assess the level of predation provided by natural enemies in agricultural systems. While a number of different methodologies are currently in use, little is known about how arthropod predators respond to artificially-manipulated sentinel prey in comparison to predation on free-living prey populations. We assessed how attack rates on immobilised (aphids stuck to cards) and artificial (plasticine lepidopteran larvae mimic...
#1John W. Redhead (University of Reading)H-Index: 16
#2Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 33
Last.Tom H. Oliver (University of Reading)H-Index: 25
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Understanding spatial variation in the structure and stability of plant-pollinator networks, and their relationship with anthropogenic drivers, is key to maintaining pollination services and mitigating declines. Constructing sufficient networks to examine patterns over large spatial scales remains challenging. Using biological records (citizen science), we constructed potential plant-pollinator networks at 10km resolution across Great Britain, comprising all potential interactions inferred from ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Daniel S. Karp (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 20
#2Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer (Stanford University)H-Index: 19
Last.Yi Zou (Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University)H-Index: 8
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The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation i...
59 CitationsSource
#1Arran Greenop (Lancaster University)H-Index: 2
#2Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 33
Last.Richard F. PywellH-Index: 42
view all 5 authors...
The use of pesticides within agricultural ecosystems has led to wide concern regarding negative effects on the environment. One possible alternative is the use of predators of pest species that naturally occur within agricultural ecosystems. However, the mechanistic basis for how species can be manipulated in order to maximise pest control remains unclear. We carried out a meta-analysis of 51 studies that manipulated predator species richness in reference to suppression of herbivore prey to dete...
8 CitationsSource
#1Marek CzerwińskiH-Index: 2
#2Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 33
Last.Wiktor Kotowski (University of Warsaw)H-Index: 15
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Abstract The restoration of grasslands is a key management practice that supports biodiversity across Europe. On species poor grasslands and ex-arable fields, the establishment of plant species is often limited by the availability of habitat niches, in particular space to germinate. We investigated the impacts of full inversion tillage and its interaction with site conditions and functional traits on the abundance of 51 plant species sown into a 2 ha ex-arable site in Poland. Soils of the donor ...
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#1Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 33
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