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Jarrod A. Santora
University of California, Santa Cruz
56Publications
17H-index
816Citations
Publications 56
Newest
#1Andrew R. Thompson (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 12
#2Chris J. Harvey (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 26
Last.Thomas P. Good (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 7
view all 22 authors...
Abstract Forage fishes are ecologically and economically important in marine ecosystems worldwide and thus are a focal topic for ecosystem-based fisheries management. In the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME), the community dynamics of forage populations have been studied at regional spatial scales, but not across regions. To evaluate indicators of the forage community at the ecosystem-wide scale, we examine temporal variability of forage assemblages in Northern (Oregon/Washington...
#1John P. Ryan (MBARI: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)H-Index: 36
#2Danelle E. Cline (MBARI: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)H-Index: 7
Last.Reiko Michisaki (MBARI: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)H-Index: 5
view all 16 authors...
This study examines the occurrence of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the northeast Pacific from three years of continuous recordings off central California (36.713°N, 122.186°W). Song is prevalent in this feeding and migratory habitat, spanning nine months of the year (September–May), peaking in winter (November–January), and reaching a maximum of 86% temporal coverage (during November 2017). From the rise of song in fall through the end of peak occurrence in winter, song length...
#1Isaac D. Schroeder (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 14
#2Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
Last.John C. Field (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 23
view all 9 authors...
Elucidating connections between ocean climate variability and change and recruitment of juvenile fishes to adult populations is critical for understanding variability in stock–recruit dynamics. Rec...
#1Michael W. Thayne (University of Akureyri)
#2Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
Last.Jaime Jahncke (Point Blue Conservation Science)H-Index: 10
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The abundance and distribution of Northern anchovy ( Engraulis mordax ) and young of the year (YOY) rockfish ( Sebastes spp.) are critical for the survival and reproduction of seabirds, mammals, and predatory fish within the California Current Ecosystem. Traditional detection and quantification of forage fish by trawling can be time consuming and expensive, and may not provide the spatio-temporal resolution needed to examine ecological relationships in quickly-changing marine environmen...
#1Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
#2Ramona ZenoH-Index: 1
Last.William J. SydemanH-Index: 45
view all 4 authors...
Submarine canyon systems are ubiquitous features of marine ecosystems, known to support high levels of biodiversity. Canyons may be important to benthic-pelagic ecosystem coupling, but their role in concentrating plankton and structuring pelagic communities is not well known. We hypothesize that at the scale of a large marine ecosystem, canyons provide a critical habitat network, which maintain energy flow and trophic interactions. We evaluate canyon characteristics relative to the distribution ...
#1Pete Warzybok (Point Blue Conservation Science)H-Index: 8
#2Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
Last.Gerard J. McChesney (FWS: United States Fish and Wildlife Service)H-Index: 4
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Effective ecosystem-based fishery management involves assessment of foraging interactions among consumers, including upper level predators such as marine birds and humans. Of particular value is information on predator energetic and consumption demands and how they vary in response to the often volatile dynamics of forage populations, as well as the factors that affect forage availability and potential prey switching. We examined the prey requirements of common murre ( Uria aalge ), Bra...
#1Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
#2Lisa B. Eisner (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 19
Last.George L. Hunt (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
Abstract We assessed the biogeography of seabirds within the Bering Sea Large Marine Ecosystem (LME), a highly productive and extensive continental shelf system that supports important fishing grounds. Our objective was to investigate how physical ocean conditions impact distribution of seabirds along latitudinal gradients. We tested the hypothesis that seabird biogeographic patterns reflect differences in ocean conditions relating to the boundary between northern and southern shelf ecosystems. ...
#1David G. AinleyH-Index: 55
#2Jarrod A. Santora (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
Last.Russell W. Bradley (Point Blue Conservation Science)H-Index: 14
view all 16 authors...
Abstract The Brandt's Cormorant of the California Current is a “boom-or-bust” species like its congeners in other eastern boundary, upwelling driven ecosystems, and like many of the prey upon which they depend. These birds produce many recruits when fish availability is high, leading to rapidly increasing populations, but few recruits, and may even exhibit die-offs, when the opposite is true. Unlike cormorants in the Peru and Benguela currents, however, Brandt's Cormorant population changes have...
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