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Allyson Holbrook
University of Newcastle
94Publications
13H-index
572Citations
Publications 94
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Ecopsychology
Tyson Whitten1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Robert Stevens2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Department of Education and Communities)
+ 5 AuthorsVaughan J. Carr56
Estimated H-index: 56
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Abstract Though the positive association between a connection to the natural environment and well-being is well established, few studies have examined this association in children, and none have explored whether this relationship remains when accounting for other factors that affect well-being, such as social supports, attention, and empathic skills. The current study aims to address this gap. Data are drawn from the New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS) and comprise a representative...
Published on Nov 12, 2018
Kylie Shaw4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Newcastle),
Allyson Holbrook13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Newcastle)
Purpose This paper aims to respond to the need for a model of doctoral supervision that can capture and represent the focus, range and complexity of instructional intentions, practices and possibilities. Design/methodology/approach The study draws on the substantive literature on supervision and changing doctoral programs in the Fine Arts and relatively new empirical findings about supervision and learning. The authors posit a holistic model of supervision ranging across micro–macro and product–...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in International Journal of Epidemiology 7.34
Melissa J. Green38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Felicity Harris6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 14 AuthorsMaxwell Smith4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Newcastle)
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Academic Ethics
Allyson Holbrook13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Newcastle),
Kerry Dally12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Newcastle)
+ 2 AuthorsHedy Fairbairn6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Newcastle)
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Academic Ethics
Allyson Holbrook13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Newcastle),
Kerry Dally12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Newcastle)
+ 2 AuthorsHedy Fairbairn6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Newcastle)
There is an expectation that all researchers will act ethically and responsibly in the conduct of research involving humans and animals. While research ethics is mentioned in quality indicators and codes of responsible researcher conduct, it appears to have little profile in doctoral assessment. There seems to be an implicit assumption that ethical competence has been achieved by the end of doctoral candidacy and that there is no need for candidates to report on the ethical dimensions of their s...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Linguistics and Education 1.52
Sue Starfield12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Brian Paltridge19
Estimated H-index: 19
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 4 AuthorsHedy Fairbairn6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Newcastle)
Abstract One of the principal roles of a PhD examiner is to judge ‘both the potential of the researcher and the quality of the research’ ( Holbrook, Bourke, Fairbairn, & Lovat, 2014 , p. 986). While examiners may be guided by criteria supplied by universities, the descriptors they are provided with can often be open to interpretation. Interpreting an examiner's report can present a challenge to students and their supervisors, exacerbated by the often ambiguous use of language in the reports. Thi...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in BMJ Open 2.38
Kristin R. Laurens32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Stacy Tzoumakis8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 10 AuthorsRobert Stevens2
Estimated H-index: 2
Purpose The Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) was designed as a computerised self-report assessment of children’s mental health and well-being at approximately 11 years of age, conducted with a population cohort of 87 026 children being studied longitudinally within the New South Wales (NSW) Child Development Study. Participants School Principals provided written consent for teachers to administer the MCS in class to year 6 students at 829 NSW schools (35.0% of eligible schools). Parent or child opt...
Published on Jan 2, 2017in Studies in Higher Education 2.85
Robert Cantwell11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Newcastle),
Sid Bourke18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Newcastle)
+ 2 AuthorsJanene Budd2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Newcastle)
A national cohort of doctoral students (n = 1390) completed a suite of metacognitive questionnaires indicating management of affective, intellectual and contingency demands in learning. Responses to the questionnaires were analysed for evidence of individual differences in reported metacognitive behaviours. Three patterns of metacognitive response to doctoral learning were identified through cluster analysis: Constructive Engagement, Struggling to Engage and Disengaged. Central to these clusters...
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Craig Batty5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Allyson Holbrook13
Estimated H-index: 13
There is general agreement that doctoral research should show 'originality', but there is less agreement about what that means or how it is distinguished from 'contribution'. There is also a strand in the literature that attests that different disciplines, especially relative newcomers to the doctorate such as the creative arts, privilege different qualities of originality and forms of contribution. This prompts the question: what constitutes an original contribution in the field of creative wri...
Elena Prieto10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Newcastle),
Allyson Holbrook13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Newcastle),
Sid Bourke18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Newcastle)
In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, di...
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