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Lyn Y. Abramson
University of Wisconsin-Madison
268Publications
75H-index
29.5kCitations
Publications 268
Newest
#1Andrew A. Gepty (GW: George Washington University)
#2Jessica L. Hamilton (University of Pittsburgh)
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 4 authors...
Living in high crime areas and rumination each have been identified as risk factors for depression among youth, yet it is unclear how crime and rumination may synergistically increase the risk of adolescent depression. Adolescents (N = 309; 51% female, Mage= 12.9, SD = 0.61) completed self-report measures of rumination, depressive symptoms, and provided local addresses, which were used to match police district crime statistics. Approximately one year later, participants again reported depressive...
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#1Emily E. Bernstein (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
#2Evan M. Kleiman (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 23
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 8 authors...
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#1Allison Stumper (TU: Temple University)
#2Thomas M. Olino (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 33
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 4 authors...
Off-time pubertal development is a predictor of substance use among adolescents. Early-maturing girls and early- and late-maturing boys appear to be at greater risk for substance use, although findings are more consistent for girls. Although cognitive factors are also important in the etiology of adolescent substance use, few studies have investigated potential cognitive risk and protective factors in these associations. The current study tested whether future orientation or cognitive style (e.g...
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#1Allison Stumper (TU: Temple University)
#2Daniel P. Moriarity (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 2
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 6 authors...
A better understanding of the maturational correlates of inflammatory activity during adolescence is needed to more appropriately study both normal and abnormal development. Inflammation is the immune system’s first response to infection, injury, or psychological stress, and it has been shown to be elevated in individuals with both physical and psychological conditions. This study examined unique associations between (1) pubertal status and inflammatory biomarkers, and (2) age and inflammatory b...
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#1Daniel P. Moriarity (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 2
#2Naoise Mac Giollabhui (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 3
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 7 authors...
Inflammation has been implicated in depressive symptoms, but few studies use longitudinal designs with adolescents. Furthermore, the extant literature has yielded inconsistent results. Blood was co...
2 CitationsSource
#1Richard T. Liu (Brown University)H-Index: 20
#2Brae Anne McArthur (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 3
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Whether cognitive vulnerability to depression exists along a continuum of severity or as a qualitatively discrete phenomenological entity has direct bearing on theoretical formulations of risk for depression and clinical risk assessment. This question is of particular relevance to adolescence, given that cognitive vulnerability appears to coalesce and rates of depression begin to rise markedly during this period of development. Although a dimensional view is often assumed, it is necessa...
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#1Allison Stumper (TU: Temple University)
#2Thomas M. Olino (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 33
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 4 authors...
Depression increases dramatically during adolescence. This finding has been demonstrated using multiple measures, including the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI). The CDI is one of the most commonly used measures to assess depression in youth. However, there is little agreement on its factor structure, and it is possible that its factor structure changes over time. Yet, no study to date has investigated whether this structure is longitudinally invariant from early- to mid-adolescence. The pr...
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#1Liza M. Haas (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 1
#2Brae Anne McArthur (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 3
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 6 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Corinne P. Bart (TU: Temple University)
#2Lyn Y. Abramson (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 75
Last.Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 68
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Both reward sensitivity and impulsivity are related to the development and course of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs) and have been implicated in other disorders and negative functional outcomes such as substance abuse, obesity, suicidal behaviors, and risk-taking. Furthermore, according to the transactional component of the Behavioral Approach System (BAS)/reward hypersensitivity theory of BSDs, people with reward hypersensitivity should experience more BAS-relevant events, and thus, ...
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#1Marin M. KautzH-Index: 4
#2Brae Anne McArthurH-Index: 3
Last.Lauren B. AlloyH-Index: 68
view all 7 authors...
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