Match!
Hilary Williamson Hoynes
National Bureau of Economic Research
WelfareLabour economicsEconomicsWelfare reformSafety net
93Publications
31H-index
4,587Citations
What is this?
Publications 95
Newest
We use novel, large-scale data on 43 million Americans from the 2000 Census and the 2001 to 2013 American Communities Survey linked to the Social Security Administration’s NUMIDENT to study how a policy-driven increase in economic resources for families affects children’s long-term outcomes. Using variation from the county-level roll-out of the Food Stamps program between 1961 and 1975, we find that children with access to greater economic resources before age five experience an increase of 6 pe...
Source
#1Erin Todd Bronchetti (Swarthmore College)H-Index: 6
#2Garret Christensen (United States Census Bureau)H-Index: 4
Last. Hilary Williamson Hoynes (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) is one of the most important elements of the social safety net. Unlike most other safety net programs, SNAP varies little across states and over time, which creates challenges for quasi-experimental evaluation. Notably, SNAP benefits are fixed across 48 states; but local food prices vary, leading to geographic variation in the real value – or purchasing power – of SNAP benefits. In this study, we provide the firs...
Source
#1Mike Brewer (University of Essex)H-Index: 25
#2Hilary Williamson Hoynes (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 31
In‐work credits grew in popularity worldwide during the late 1990s and 2000s as a means of reforming welfare systems in ways that could both encourage work and reduce poverty. This paper reviews the role of in‐work tax credits in the UK and the US, what is known and remains to be known about their impacts and distributional consequences, and the possibilities for reform. Evidence is clear that in‐work credits reduce poverty and can encourage lone parents to work, but have minimal impacts, in agg...
1 CitationsSource
In this article, I review the most prominent provision of the federal income tax code that targets low-income tax filers, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), as well as the structurally similar Ch...
Source
Source
We discuss the potential role of universal basic incomes (UBIs) in advanced countries. A feature of advanced economies that distinguishes them from developing countries is the existence of well-dev...
2 CitationsSource
#1Hilary Williamson Hoynes (NBER: National Bureau of Economic Research)H-Index: 31
#2Mark Stabile (NBER: National Bureau of Economic Research)H-Index: 23
The past quarter-century has seen substantial change in the social safety nets for families with children in the United States and Canada. Both countries have moved away from cash welfare, but the United States has relied more on work requirements. We examine the implications for the employment and poverty of low-educated single mothers. We find that employment improved substantially in both countries, absolutely and relative to a control group of single women without children. Poverty rates als...
1 CitationsSource
We discuss the potential role of Universal Basic Incomes (UBIs) in advanced countries. A feature of advanced economies that distinguishes them from developing countries is the existence of well developed, if often incomplete, safety nets. We develop a framework for describing transfer programs, flexible enough to encompass most existing programs as well as UBIs, and use this framework to compare various UBIs to the existing constellation of programs in the United States. A UBI would direct much ...
10 CitationsSource
#1Hilary Williamson Hoynes (NBER: National Bureau of Economic Research)H-Index: 31
#2Ankur J. Patel (NBER: National Bureau of Economic Research)H-Index: 3
We examine the effect of the EITC on the poverty and income of single mothers with children using a quasi-experimental approach that leverages variation in generosity due to policy expansions across tax years and family sizes. We find that the income increasing effects of the EITC are concentrated between 75 and 150 percent of income-to-poverty with little effect at the lowest income levels and at levels of 250 percent of poverty and higher. We use these results to show that by failing to captur...
3 CitationsSource
#2Camille LandaisH-Index: 13
Last. Johannes SpinnewijnH-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
12345678910