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Kevin R. Crooks
Colorado State University
139Publications
33H-index
5,505Citations
Publications 139
Newest
Courtney L. Larson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Sarah E. Reed13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ -3 AuthorsKevin R. Crooks33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Published on Jun 22, 2019in bioRxiv
Trumbo (CSU: Colorado State University), Pe Salerno (CSU: Colorado State University)+ 11 AuthorsScott Carver18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
Apex predators are important indicators of intact natural ecosystems. They are also sensitive to urbanization because they require broad home ranges and extensive contiguous habitat to support their prey base. Pumas (Puma concolor) can persist near human developed areas, but urbanization may be detrimental to their movement ecology, population structure, and genetic diversity. To investigate potential effects of urbanization in population connectivity of pumas, we performed a landscape genomics ...
Published on Apr 19, 2019in Viruses 3.81
Sarah R. Kechejian , Nick Dannemiller + 13 AuthorsWinston Vickers7
Estimated H-index: 7
Feline foamy virus (FFV) is a retrovirus that has been detected in multiple feline species, including domestic cats (Felis catus) and pumas (Puma concolor). FFV results in persistent infection but is generally thought to be apathogenic. Sero-prevalence in domestic cat populations has been documented in several countries, but the extent of viral infections in nondomestic felids has not been reported. In this study, we screened sera from 348 individual pumas from Colorado, Southern California and ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Evolutionary Applications 5.04
Christopher P. Kozakiewicz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UTAS: University of Tasmania),
Christopher P. Burridge25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
+ 6 AuthorsScott Carver18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
Landscape genetics has provided many insights into how heterogeneous landscape features drive processes influencing spatial genetic variation in free-living organisms. This rapidly developing field has focused heavily on vertebrates, and expansion of this scope to the study of infectious diseases holds great potential for landscape geneticists and disease ecologists alike. The potential application of landscape genetics to infectious agents has garnered attention at formative stages in the devel...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Ecology and Evolution 2.42
Annie Kellner1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Scott Carver18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
+ 5 AuthorsMichael F. Antolin34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Conservation Biology 6.19
Rachel T. Buxton9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Rachel T. Buxton (CSU: Colorado State University)+ 5 AuthorsGeorge Wittemyer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Global Ecology and Conservation
Rachel T. Buxton9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Patrick E. Lendrum1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 1 AuthorsGeorge Wittemyer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Abstract Over the past two decades, the use of camera traps and acoustic monitoring in the investigation of animal ecology have grown rapidly, with each technique enhancing broad-scale wildlife surveying. Camera traps are a cost-effective, noninvasive means of sampling communities of mid-to large-terrestrial species, and acoustic recording devices capture human sounds and sound-producing animals, including species of mammals, birds, anurans, and insects. Rarely are these techniques combined, des...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Biological Conservation 4.45
Stacy A. Lischka1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Tara L. Teel18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 4 AuthorsKevin R. Crooks33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Abstract There is growing recognition that interdisciplinary approaches that account for both ecological and social processes are necessary to successfully address human-wildlife interactions. However, such approaches are hindered by challenges in aligning data types, communicating across disciplines, and applying social science information to conservation actions. To meet these challenges, we propose a conceptual model that adopts a social-ecological systems approach and integrates social and e...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Landscape and Urban Planning 5.14
Courtney L. Larson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Sarah E. Reed13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 1 AuthorsKevin R. Crooks33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CSU: Colorado State University)
Abstract Outdoor recreation is a valuable ecosystem service permitted in most protected areas globally. Land-use planners and managers are often responsible for providing access to natural areas for recreation while avoiding environmental impacts such as declines of threatened species. Since recreation can have harmful effects on biodiversity, reliable information about protected-area visitation patterns is vital for managers. Our goal was to quantify recreational use in a fragmented urban reser...
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