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Kevin Milligan
University of British Columbia
114Publications
26H-index
3,306Citations
Publications 114
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#1Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
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#1Michael G. Baker (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 51
#2Jonathan Gruber (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 69
Last.Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
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1 CitationsSource
#1Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
Source
#1Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
#2Michael Smart (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 25
We develop a theory of cross-border income shifting in response to subnational personal taxation in a federation and examine its implications for the excess burden of personal taxes. We show how a properly chosen federal tax rate can offset the fiscal externality between states and facilitate decentralization, even in a heterogeneous federation where unitary taxation is suboptimal. Optimal taxes depend on the elasticities of national tax avoidance and of cross-state tax base shifting. We estimat...
1 CitationsSource
#1Courtney CoileH-Index: 17
#2Kevin MilliganH-Index: 26
Last.David A. WiseH-Index: 58
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#1Kevin MilliganH-Index: 26
#2Tammy SchirleH-Index: 9
#1Kevin MilliganH-Index: 26
#2Tammy SchirleH-Index: 9
Source
We find a steep earnings-longevity gradient using fifty years of administrative data from Canada, with men in the top ventile of earnings living eight years (11 percent) longer than those in the bottom ventile. For women, the difference is 3.6 years. Unlike the United States, this longevity gradient in Canada has shifted uniformly through time, with approximately equal gains across the earnings distribution. We compare our results using cross-sectional and cohort-based methods, finding similar t...
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We explore recent trends in the labour force participation rates of men aged 55-69 in Canada. Following steady declines in participation until the mid-1990s, the participation rates of older men have increased substantially and have reached historically high rates among those aged 65-69. We consider various factors that may influence the participation rates of older men and suggest that improvements in health, higher education, and increased attachment of older wives to the labour market are lik...
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#1Kevin Milligan (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 26
#2Tammy Schirle (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 9
We address health capacity to work among older Canadian workers with a specific focus on differences by gender and region. We find that in 2012 men would have needed to work more than five addition...
1 CitationsSource
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