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Nicole B. Ellison
University of Michigan
117Publications
41H-index
23.8kCitations
Publications 117
Newest
#1Joseph B. Bayer (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 10
#2Penny Triệu (UM: University of Michigan)
Last.Nicole B. Ellison (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
view all 3 authors...
This review delineates core components of the social media ecosystem, specifying how online platforms complicate established social psychological effects. We assess four pairs of social media eleme...
#1Nicole B. Ellison (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
#2Megan French (Stanford University)H-Index: 3
Last.Penny Trieu (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Scholars studying social media have embraced the opportunities afforded by behavioral data captured by online tools to explore the implications of platform use for outcomes such as well-being, relationship maintenance, and perceptions of social capital. However, the prevalence of these methods demands that we consider their potential limitations and the question of how to best combine them with more traditional methods, such as self-report surveys. For this panel, scholars will share brief prese...
#1Nicole B. Ellison (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
#1Joseph B. Bayer (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 10
#2Nicole B. EllisonH-Index: 41
Last.Emily B. Falk (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
This article advances a contextual approach to understanding the emotional and social outcomes of Facebook use. In doing so, we address the ambiguity of previously reported relationships between Facebook use and well-being. We test temporal (shorter vs longer time spans) and spatial (at home vs away from home) dimensions of Facebook activity using an innovative approach. By triggering smartphone surveys in response to users’ naturalistic Facebook posting, we captured the immediate context of bot...
#1Nicole B. EllisonH-Index: 41
Last.Cliff LampeH-Index: 33
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Adults who are 65 years or older have increasingly adopted social network sites (SNSs), Facebook in particular. Yet the ramifications of SNS use in this population remain understudied. Using a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (N = 2,003), this study focuses on Facebook users (N = 1,138) and examines patterns of Facebook use by younger (aged 18–65 years) and older users (aged 65 or older), as well as the social benefits associated with older users’ Facebook use. Findings show that ...
#1Penny Trieu (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 1
#2Joseph B. Bayer (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 10
Last.Emily B. Falk (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTIn this paper, we investigate how individual differences in availability preferences are related to (1) self-reported quality of interaction with strong and weak ties and (2) perceptions of bridging social capital. We employed experience sampling methods and collected data over the course of two weeks—combined with surveys at baseline and endpoint, from a random sample of college students (N = 154). We show that individuals who prefer to be more available to others report more rewarding ...
#1Yalda T. Uhls (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 5
#2Nicole B. Ellison (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
Last.Kaveri Subrahmanyam (California State University, Los Angeles)H-Index: 22
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In 2015, American adolescents aged 13 to 18 years reported using social media 1 hour and 11 minutes a day, 7 days a week. Social media are used for a variety of activities, including sharing information, interacting with peers, and developing a coherent identity. In this review of the research, we examine how social media are intertwined with adolescent development and assess both the costs and benefits of adolescent social media use. We include suggestions for further research and recommendatio...
#1Bas Hofstra (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 4
#2Rense Corten (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 10
Last.Nicole B. Ellison (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
Most research on segregation in social networks considers small circles of strong ties, and little is known about segregation among the much larger number of weaker ties. This article proposes a novel approach to the study of these more extended networks, through the use of data on personal ties in an online social network. We illustrate this method’s potential by describing and explaining the degree of ethnic and gender segregation on Facebook among a representative survey of adolescents in the...
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