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Bodil K. Ehlers
Aarhus University
49Publications
17H-index
1,032Citations
Publications 49
Newest
#1Sara Tomiolo (AU: Aarhus University)
#2Claire Thomas (SupAgro)
Last.Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
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Knowing which mechanisms drive the outcome of intraspecific interactions is highly relevant for understanding diversity maintenance. Many plant species exhibit strong population genetic substructure over small spatial scales due to more shared genes between conspecific close neighbours. This results in frequent interactions among genetically related plants. Predictions of how genetic similarity may drive the outcome of intraspecific interactions are based on two contrasting theories: the resourc...
#1Ana Foronda (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 3
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
Last.Yolanda Pueyo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 18
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Background The gypsovag shrub Cistus clusii is locally dominant in semi-arid gypsum plant communities of North-Eastern Spain. This species commonly grows in species-poor patches even though it has nurse potential, suggesting interference on neighbouring species. Other Cistus species exert a chemically mediated interference on plant communities, suggesting that it might be a common phenomenon in this genus. This study aimed investigating whether C. clusii exerts chemically mediated interference o...
#1Robert R. Junker (University of Salzburg)H-Index: 18
#2Jonas Kuppler (University of Salzburg)H-Index: 5
Last.Florian Etl (University of Vienna)H-Index: 3
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Chemical communication is ubiquitous. The identification of conserved structural elements in visual and acoustic communication is well established, but comparable information on chemical communication displays (CCDs) is lacking. We assessed the phenotypic integration of CCDs in a meta-analysis to characterize patterns of covariation in CCDs and identified functional or biosynthetically constrained modules. Poorly integrated plant CCDs (i.e. low covariation between scent compounds) support the no...
#1Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
#2Martin Holmstrup (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 39
Last.Thomas Bataillon (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 33
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Most studies on consequences of environmental change focus on evolutionary and phenotypic plastic responses, but parental effects represent an additional mechanism by which organisms respond to their local environment. Parental effects can be adaptive if they enhance offsprings ability to cope with environments experienced by their parents, but can also be non-adaptive for instance when offspring from benign environments are just better provisioned and hence perform better than offspring from le...
It has been suggested that in order to infer ecological processes from observed patterns of species abundance we need to investigate the covariance in species abundance. Consequently, an expression for the expected covariance of pin-point cover measurements of two species is developed. By comparing the observed covariance with the expected covariance we get a new type of information on the spatial arrangement of two species. Here the discrepancy between the observed and expected covariance may b...
#1Martin Holmstrup (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 39
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
Last.Matty P. Berg (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 36
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Human activities have caused global changes of atmospheric chemistry resulting in increased temperature especially in the colder regions of the northern hemisphere. Since warming of the environment can have drastic effects on terrestrial ecosystems it is important to experimentally evaluate the extent of such effects in long-term field-based experiments. In this study we make use of both recent (short-term) and long-term geothermal warming of Icelandic soils to examine the responses of Collembol...
#1Morten Tune Strandberg (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 12
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
#1Maeva Mollion (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 2
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 17
Last.Thomas Bataillon (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 33
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Gynodioecy is a sexual dimorphism where females coexist with hermaphrodite individuals. In most cases, this dimorphism involves the interaction of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes and nuclear restorer genes. Two scenarios can account for how these interactions maintain gynodioecy. Either CMS genes recurrently enter populations at low frequency via mutation or migration and go to fixation unimpeded (successive sweeps), or CMS genes maintain polymorphism over evolutionary time through intera...
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