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Bodil K. Ehlers
Aarhus University
PollinationEcologyPopulationBotanyBiology
50Publications
19H-index
1,112Citations
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Publications 53
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#1Trine Grabau Jensen (AU: Aarhus University)
#2Martin Holmstrup (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 41
Last. Stine Slotsbo (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 11
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Abstract Volatile monoterpenes are emitted in large quantities to both air and soil by many plant species. While studies have addressed effects of monoterpenes on aboveground invertebrates, we have much poorer understanding of the possible effects of monoterpenes on soil invertebrates. Monoterpenes play a protective role in some plant species during heat and water stress, and therefore may provide similar protection against abiotic stress to soil invertebrates. The aim of the present study was t...
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#1Sara Tomiolo (AU: Aarhus University)
#2Claire Thomas (SupAgro)
Last. Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
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Knowing which mechanisms drive the outcome of intraspecific interactions is highly relevant for understanding diversity maintenance. Plant species that exhibit strong genetic substructure over small spatial scales may be exposed to frequent interactions with closely related individuals. Predictions of how genetic similarity may drive the outcome of intraspecific interactions are based on two contrasting theories: the resource partitioning hypothesis and kin selection theory. The first predicts t...
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#1Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
#2Trine Bilde (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 30
The findings that some plants alter their competitive phenotype in response to genetic relatedness of its conspecific neighbour (and presumed competitor) has spurred an increasing interest in plant kin‐interactions. This phenotypic response suggests the ability to assess the genetic relatedness of conspecific competitors, proposing kin selection as a process that can influence plant competitive interactions. Kin selection can favour restrained competitive growth towards kin, if the fitness loss ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Christian DamgaardH-Index: 36
#2Bettina NygaardH-Index: 12
Last. Bodil K. EhlersH-Index: 19
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QUESTIONS: The change in the frequencies of invasive higher plant species in different habitat types was investigated using Danish monitoring data from 2004 to 2014. LOCATION: Denmark. METHODS: The occurrence data were collected in circles with a radius of 5 m at a number of plots within 923 sites. The sampling intensity was irregular with sampling intervals ranging from one to three years. The hierarchical occurrence data were fitted in a hierarchical model, where the site‐specific occurrence p...
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#1Ana Foronda (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 3
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
Last. Yolanda Pueyo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 18
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Background The gypsovag shrub Cistus clusii is locally dominant in semi-arid gypsum plant communities of North-Eastern Spain. This species commonly grows in species-poor patches even though it has nurse potential, suggesting interference on neighbouring species. Other Cistus species exert a chemically mediated interference on plant communities, suggesting that it might be a common phenomenon in this genus. This study aimed investigating whether C. clusii exerts chemically mediated interference o...
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#1Robert R. Junker (University of Salzburg)H-Index: 19
#2Jonas Kuppler (University of Salzburg)H-Index: 5
Last. Tobias G. Köllner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 34
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Chemical communication is ubiquitous. The identification of conserved structural elements in visual and acoustic communication is well established, but comparable information on chemical communication displays (CCDs) is lacking. We assessed the phenotypic integration of CCDs in a meta-analysis to characterize patterns of covariation in CCDs and identified functional or biosynthetically constrained modules. Poorly integrated plant CCDs (i.e. low covariation between scent compounds) support the no...
22 CitationsSource
#1Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
#2Martin Holmstrup (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 41
Last. Thomas Bataillon (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 36
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Most studies on consequences of environmental change focus on evolutionary and phenotypic plastic responses, but parental effects represent an additional mechanism by which organisms respond to their local environment. Parental effects can be adaptive if they enhance offsprings ability to cope with environments experienced by their parents, but can also be non-adaptive for instance when offspring from benign environments are just better provisioned and hence perform better than offspring from le...
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#1Martin Holmstrup (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 41
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
Last. Matty P. Berg (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 36
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1. Human activities have caused global changes of atmospheric chemistry resulting in increased temperature especially in the colder regions of the northern hemisphere. Since warming of the environment can have drastic effects on terrestrial ecosystems it is important to experimentally evaluate the extent of such effects in long-term field-based experiments. In this study we make use of both recent (short-term) and long-term geothermal warming of Icelandic soils to examine the responses of Collem...
2 CitationsSource
It has been suggested that in order to infer ecological processes from observed patterns of species abundance we need to investigate the covariance in species abundance. Consequently, an expression for the expected covariance of pin-point cover measurements of two species is developed. By comparing the observed covariance with the expected covariance we get a new type of information on the spatial arrangement of two species. Here the discrepancy between the observed and expected covariance may b...
2 CitationsSource
#1Morten Tune Strandberg (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 13
#2Bodil K. Ehlers (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 19
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