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Joshua D. Koen
University of Notre Dame
18Publications
10H-index
489Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1Joshua D. Koen (ND: University of Notre Dame)H-Index: 10
#2Michael D. Rugg (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 92
Many cognitive abilities decline with age even in the absence of detectable pathology. Recent evidence indicates that age-related neural dedifferentiation, operationalized in terms of neural selectivity, may contribute to this decline. We review here work exploring the relationship between neural dedifferentiation, cognition, and age. Compelling evidence for age effects on neural selectivity comes from both non-human animal and human research. However, current data suggest that age does not mode...
#1Joshua D. Koen (ND: University of Notre Dame)H-Index: 10
#2Nedra Hauck (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 2
Last.Michael D. Rugg (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 92
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Healthy aging is associated with decreased neural selectivity (dedifferentiation) in category-selective cortical regions. This finding has prompted the suggestion that dedifferentiation contributes to age-related cognitive decline. Consistent with this possibility, dedifferentiation has been reported to negatively correlate with fluid intelligence in older adults. Here, we examined whether dedifferentiation is associated with performance in another cognitive domain — episodic memory — that is al...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Preston P. Thakral (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
Last.Michael D. Rugg (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 92
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ABSTRACTThe left angular gyrus (AG) is thought to play a critical role in episodic retrieval and has been implicated in the recollection of specific details of prior episodes. Motivated by recent fMRI studies in which it was reported that elevated neural activity in left AG during study is predictive of subsequent associative memory, the present study investigated whether the region plays a causal role in associative memory encoding. Participants underwent online transcranial magnetic stimulatio...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Erin Horne (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 2
Last.Michael D. Rugg (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 92
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Prestimulus subsequent memory effects (preSMEs)—differences in neural activity elicited by a task cue at encoding that are predictive of later memory performance—are thought to reflect differential...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Frederick S. Barrett (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 13
Last.Andrew P. Yonelinas (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 59
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Signal-detection theory, and the analysis of receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs), has played a critical role in the development of theories of episodic memory and perception. The purpose of the current paper is to present the ROC Toolbox. This toolbox is a set of functions written in the Matlab programming language that can be used to fit various common signal detection models to ROC data obtained from confidence rating experiments. The goals for developing the ROC Toolbox were to create a...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Alyssa A. Borders (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 3
Last.Andrew P. Yonelinas (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 59
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The medial temporal lobe (MTL) plays a critical role in episodic long-term memory, but whether the MTL is necessary for visual short-term memory is controversial. Some studies have indicated that MTL damage disrupts visual short-term memory performance whereas other studies have failed to find such evidence. To account for these mixed results, it has been proposed that the hippocampus is critical in supporting short-term memory for high resolution complex bindings, while the cortex is sufficient...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Michael D. Rugg (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 92
Memory reactivation—the reinstatement of processes and representations engaged when an event is initially experienced—is believed to play an important role in strengthening and updating episodic memory. The present study examines how memory reactivation during a potentially interfering event influences memory for a previously experienced event. Participants underwent fMRI during the encoding phase of an AB/AC interference task in which some words were presented twice in association with two diff...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 10
#2Andrew P. Yonelinas (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 59
Although it is generally accepted that ageing is associated with recollection impairments, there is considerable disagreement surrounding how healthy ageing influences familiarity-based recognition. One factor that might contribute to the mixed findings regarding age differences in familiarity is the estimation method used to quantify the two mnemonic processes. Here, this issue is examined by having a group of older adults (N = 39) between 40 and 81 years of age complete remember/know (RK), rec...
#1Joshua D. Koen (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 10
#2Andrew P. Yonelinas (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 59
It is well established that healthy aging, amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI), and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) are associated with substantial declines in episodic memory. However, there is still debate as to how two forms of episodic memory – recollection and familiarity – are affected by healthy and pathological aging. To address this issue we conducted a meta-analytic review of the effect sizes reported in studies using remember/know (RK), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and proce...
In studies of human recognition memory, considerable debate has been centered on determining whether the dual process signal-detection (DPSD) model or the unequal-variance signal-detection (UVSD) model provides a better account of memory performance. At the heart of this debate is how to account for the ubiquitous finding that old items have more variable strengths than new items (Egan, 1958; Ratcliff, Sheu, & Gronlund, 1992; Wixted, 2007; Yonelinas & Parks, 2007), a finding referred to as the o...
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