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Manjeet K. Bolla
University of Cambridge
129Publications
30H-index
5,132Citations
Publications 129
Newest
#1Celine M. Vachon (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 52
#2Christopher G. Scott (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 46
Last.Montserrat Garcia-ClosasH-Index: 82
view all 36 authors...
Mammographic breast density, adjusted for age and body mass index, and a polygenic risk score (PRS), comprised of common genetic variation, are both strong risk factors for breast cancer and increase discrimination of risk models. Understanding their joint contribution will be important to more accurately predict risk. Using 3628 breast cancer cases and 5126 controls of European ancestry from eight case-control studies, we evaluated joint associations of a 77-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...
2 CitationsSource
#1Xia Jiang (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 6
#2Hilary K. Finucane (Broad Institute)H-Index: 29
Last.Sara Lindstroem (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 46
view all 333 authors...
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#1Xia Jiang (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 6
#2Hilary K. Finucane (Broad Institute)H-Index: 29
Last.Sara Lindstroem (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 46
view all 333 authors...
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#1Xia Jiang (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 6
#2Hilary K. Finucane (Broad Institute)H-Index: 29
Last.Sara Lindstroem (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 46
view all 333 authors...
Quantifying the genetic correlation between cancers can provide important insights into the mechanisms driving cancer etiology. Using genome-wide association study summary statistics across six cancer types based on a total of 296,215 cases and 301,319 controls of European ancestry, here we estimate the pair-wise genetic correlations between breast, colorectal, head/neck, lung, ovary and prostate cancer, and between cancers and 38 other diseases. We observed statistically significant genetic cor...
9 CitationsSource
#1Pooja Middha Kapoor (DKFZ: German Cancer Research Center)H-Index: 1
#2Sara Lindstroem (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 46
Last.Argyrios Ziogas (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 62
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#1Yaohua Yang (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 1
#2Xiang Shu (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 3
Last.Jirong Long (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 51
view all 46 authors...
Abstract Background We previously conducted a systematic field synopsis of 1059 breast cancer candidate gene studies and investigated 279 genetic variants, 51 of which showed associations. The major limitation of this work was the small sample size, even pooling data from all 1059 studies. Thereafter, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have accumulated data for hundreds of thousands of subjects. It's necessary to re-evaluate these variants in large GWAS datasets. Methods Of these 279 variant...
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#1Haoyu Zhang (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas U. Ahearn (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 11
Last.Nilanjan Chatterjee (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 74
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Breast cancer susceptibility variants frequently show heterogeneity in associations by tumor subtype. To identify novel loci, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 133,384 breast cancer cases and 113,789 controls, plus 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414 with breast cancer) of European ancestry, using both standard and novel methodologies that account for underlying tumor heterogeneity by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth fac...
1 CitationsSource
#1Xia JiangH-Index: 6
#2Hilary K. FinucaneH-Index: 29
Last.Sara LindstroemH-Index: 46
view all 333 authors...
textabstractAn amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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#1Xiang Shu (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
#2Jirong Long (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 51
Last.Wei Zheng (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 105
view all 60 authors...
Common genetic variants in 183 loci have been identified in relation to breast cancer risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These risk variants combined explain only a relatively small proportion of breast cancer heritability, particularly in Asian populations. To search for additional genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of data from GWAS conducted in Asians (24,206 cases and 24,775 controls). Variants showing an association with breast cancer ri...
Source
#1Thomas U. Ahearn (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 11
#2Haoyu Zhang (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 3
Last.Nilanjan ChatterjeeH-Index: 74
view all 159 authors...
Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified over 170 common breast cancer susceptibility loci, many of them with differential associations by estrogen receptor (ER). How these variants are related to other tumor features is unclear. Methods: Analyses included 106,571 invasive breast cancer cases and 95,762 controls of European ancestry with data on 178 genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We used two-stage polytomous logistic regression models to evaluate ...
3 CitationsSource
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