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Joshua T. Ackerman
United States Geological Survey
BayEcologyMercury (element)BioaccumulationBiology
167Publications
32H-index
2,633Citations
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Publications 167
Newest
#1Mark P. Herzog (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 18
#2Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
Last. Sarah H. Peterson (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Michael L. Casazza (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 18
#2Fiona McDuie (Moss Landing Marine Laboratories)H-Index: 1
Last. Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
view all 9 authors...
Breeding success should increase with prior knowledge of the surrounding environment, which is dependent upon an animal's ability to evaluate habitat. Prospecting for nesting locations and migratory stopover sites are well-established behaviours among bird species. We assessed whether three species of California dabbling ducks – mallards, Anas platyrhynchos, gadwall, Mareca strepera, and cinnamon teal, Spatula cyanoptera – in Suisun Marsh, California, U.S.A., a brackish marsh, prospect for suita...
Source
#1John ChételatH-Index: 18
#2Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
Last. Craig E. HebertH-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) can result in detrimental health effects in wildlife. With advances in ecological indicators and analytical techniques for measurement of MeHg in a variety of tissues, numerous processes have been identified that can influence MeHg concentrations in wildlife. This review presents a synthesis of theoretical principals and applied information for measuring MeHg exposure and interpreting MeHg concentrations in wildlife. Mercury concentrations in wildlife ar...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca Croston (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 10
#2C. Alex Hartman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 9
Last. Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Nest attendance is an important determinant of avian reproductive success, and identifying factors that influence the frequency and duration of incubation recesses furthers our understanding of how incubating birds balance their needs with those of their offspring. We characterized the frequency and timing (start time, end time, and duration) of incubation recesses for mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and gadwall (Mareca strepera) hens breeding in Suisun Marsh, California, USA, and examined the infl...
1 CitationsSource
#1Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
#2Mark P. Herzog (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 18
Last. C. Alex Hartman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 9
view all 17 authors...
Maternal transfer is the predominant route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure to offspring. We reviewed and synthesized published and unpublished data on maternal transfer of MeHg in birds. Using paired samples of females’ blood (n=564) and their eggs (n=1814) from 26 bird species in 6 taxonomic orders, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate whether maternal transfer of MeHg to eggs differed among species and caused differential toxicity risk to embryos. Total mercury (THg) concentrations in egg...
2 CitationsSource
#1David E. Stallknecht (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 50
#2Clara Kienzle-Dean (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 1
Last. Rebecca L. PoulsonH-Index: 17
view all 18 authors...
ABSTRACT During 2014, highly pathogenic (HP) influenza A viruses (IAVs) of the A/Goose/Guangdong/1/1996 lineage (GsGD-HP-H5), originating from Asia, were detected in domestic poultry and wild birds...
Source
#1Virginia L. Winder (Benedictine College)H-Index: 9
#2Michael J. Anteau (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 19
Last. Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Mercury is a persistent, biomagnifying contaminant that can cause negative behavioral, immunological, and reproductive effects in wildlife and human populations. We examined the role of wetland water-management on mercury bioaccumulation in songbirds and ducks at Kellys Slough National Wildlife Refuge Complex, near Grand Forks, North Dakota USA. We assessed mercury concentrations in blood of wetland-foraging songbirds (80 common yellowthroats [Geothlypis trichas] and 14 Nelson’s sparrows [Ammosp...
Source
#1Rune Dietz (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 44
#2Robert J. Letcher (Carleton University)H-Index: 71
Last. Gísli A. VíkingssonH-Index: 23
view all 70 authors...
Abstract Since the last Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) effort to review biological effects of the exposure to organohalogen compounds (OHCs) in Arctic biota, there has been a considerable number of new Arctic effect studies. Here, we provide an update on the state of the knowledge of OHC, and also include mercury, exposure and/or associated effects in key Arctic marine and terrestrial mammal and bird species as well as in fish by reviewing the literature published since the la...
4 CitationsSource
#1Abram B. Fleishman (SJSU: San Jose State University)H-Index: 2
#2Rachael A. Orben (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 10
Last. Scott A. Shaffer (SJSU: San Jose State University)H-Index: 53
view all 9 authors...
Marine methylmercury concentrations vary geographically and with depth, exposing organisms to different mercury levels in different habitats. Red-legged kittiwakes (Rissa brevirostris), a specialist predator, forage on fish and invertebrates from the mesopelagic zone, a part of the ocean with elevated methylmercury concentrations. We used kittiwakes as bioindicators of MeHg concentrations in remote mesopelagic systems by examining how wintering distribution and habitat affected kittiwakes’ mercu...
1 CitationsSource
#1Fiona McDuie (Moss Landing Marine Laboratories)H-Index: 1
#2Michael L. Casazza (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 18
Last. Joshua T. Ackerman (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 32
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Context Effective wildlife management requires information on habitat and resource needs, which can be estimated with movement information and modelling energetics. One necessary component of avian models is flight speeds at multiple temporal scales. Technology has limited the ability to accurately assess flight speeds, leading to estimates of questionable accuracy, many of which have not been updated in almost a century. Aims We aimed to update flight speeds of ducks, and differentiate...
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