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Dave Goulson
University of Sussex
290Publications
61H-index
14.4kCitations
Publications 290
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#1Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 61
Summary The majority of conservation efforts and public attention are focused on large, charismatic mammals and birds such as tigers, pandas and penguins, yet the bulk of animal life, whether measured by biomass, numerical abundance or numbers of species, consists of invertebrates such as insects. Arguably, these innumerable little creatures are far more important for the functioning of ecosystems than their furry or feathered brethren, but until recently we had few long-term data on their popul...
Governmental agri-environment schemes (AES) aim to improve pollinator abundance and diversity on farmland by sowing wildflower seed mixes. These often contain high proportions of Fabaceae, particularly Trifolium (clovers), which are attractive to some bumblebee species, but not to most of the ~ 240 solitary bee species in the UK. Here we identify wildflowers that are attractive to a greater range of wild bee species. Forty-five wildflower species being farmed for commercial seed production on a ...
There is great interest in planting urban areas to benefit pollinating insects, with the potential that urban areas and gardens could act as an extensive network of pollinator-friendly habitats. However, there are a great many different plant cultivars available to the gardener, and a paucity of evidence-based advice as to which plants are truly most attractive to flower-visiting insects. Here, we report insect visitation to metre square plots of 111 different ornamental plant cultivars at a sit...
#1Angela E. Gradish (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 5
#2Jozef van der Steen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 11
Last.Bridget O’NeillH-Index: 1
view all 13 authors...
To date, regulatory pesticide risk assessments have relied on the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) as a surrogate test species for estimating the risk of pesticide exposure to all bee species. However, honey bees and non-Apis bees may differ in their susceptibility and exposure to pesticides. In 2017, a workshop ('Pesticide Exposure Assessment Paradigm for Non-Apis Bees') was held to assess if honey bee risk assessment frameworks are reflective of non-Apis bee pesticide exposu...
#1Marten Scheffer (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 89
#2J. Elizabeth Bolhuis (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 22
Last.Simon A. Levin (Princeton University)H-Index: 104
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All life requires the capacity to recover from challenges that are as inevitable as they are unpredictable. Understanding this resilience is essential for managing the health of humans and their livestock. It has long been difficult to quantify resilience directly, forcing practitioners to rely on indirect static indicators of health. However, measurements from wearable electronics and other sources now allow us to analyze the dynamics of physiology and behavior with unsurpassed resolution. The ...
#1Matthias A. Becher (University of Exeter)H-Index: 8
#2Grace Twiston‐Davies (University of Exeter)H-Index: 2
Last.Juliet L. Osborne (University of Exeter)H-Index: 40
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1. Worldwide declines in pollinators, including bumblebees, are attributed to a multitude of stressors such as habitat loss, resource availability, emerging viruses and parasites, exposure to pesticides, and climate change, operating at various spatial and temporal scales. Disentangling individual and interacting effects of these stressors, and understanding their impact at the individual, colony and population level is a challenge for systems ecology. Empirical testing of all combinations and c...
#1Patrik Byholm (Novia University of Applied Sciences)H-Index: 14
#2Sanna Mäkeläinen (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 4
Last.Dave Goulson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 61
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Abstract The evidence of negative impacts of agricultural pesticides on non-target organisms is constantly growing. One of the most widely used group of pesticides are neonicotinoids, used in treatments of various plants, e.g. oilseed crops, corn and apples, to prevent crop damage by agricultural insect pests. Treatment effects have been found to spill over to non-target insects, such as bees, and more recently also to other animal groups, among them passerine birds. Very little is known, howeve...
#1Elizabeth Nicholls (University of Sussex)H-Index: 8
#2Cristina Botías (University of Sussex)H-Index: 21
Last.Patricia Wells (Rothamsted Research)H-Index: 2
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Concerns regarding the impact of neonicotinoid exposure on bee populations recently led to an EU-wide moratorium on the use of certain neonicotinoids on flowering crops. Currently evidence regarding the impact, if any, the moratorium has had on bees’ exposure is limited. We sampled pollen and nectar from bumblebee colonies in rural and peri-urban habitats in three UK regions; Stirlingshire, Hertfordshire and Sussex. Colonies were sampled over three years; prior to the ban (2013), during the init...
#1Jules Pretty (University of Essex)H-Index: 60
#2Tim G. Benton (University of Leeds)H-Index: 51
Last.Nic Lampkin (Newbury College)H-Index: 1
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The sustainable intensification of agricultural systems offers synergistic opportunities for the co-production of agricultural and natural capital outcomes. Efficiency and substitution are steps towards sustainable intensification, but system redesign is essential to deliver optimum outcomes as ecological and economic conditions change. We show global progress towards sustainable intensification by farms and hectares, using seven sustainable intensification sub-types: integrated pest management,...
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