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Richard Palmer-Jones
University of East Anglia
58Publications
17H-index
813Citations
Publications 58
Newest
#1Vegard Iversen (University of Manchester)H-Index: 13
#2Richard Palmer-Jones (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 17
Robert Jensen and Emily Oster find that arrival of cable TV in rural India reduces women's tolerance of spousal violence, son preference and fertility, and increases women's autonomy, and school enrolment. These results are mostly replicated using their data and code. However, cable TV does not affect uneducated women. Theoretically informed index construction reduces the tolerance of violence effect, and weakens that on autonomy. We have statistical power concerns, and find errors and questiona...
#1Ian LivingstoneH-Index: 8
#2Michael TribeH-Index: 7
Last.Richard Palmer-JonesH-Index: 17
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Professor Ian Livingstone is one of a small group of British development economists who have achieved international renown and recognition. The objective of this book is to pay tribute to his life's work, particularly those aspects which related to key but challenging development issues. These issues include, at a broad level, the understanding of the economic forces determining the development of low income economies, more detailed micro work on agricultural development (irrigation in particula...
#1Maren Duvendack (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 11
#2Richard Palmer-Jones (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 17
As Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen has argued “[Bangladesh’s development achievements have] important lessons for other countries across the globe, [in particular a focus on] reducing gender inequality”. A major avenue through which this emphasis has been manifest lies, according to this narrative, in enhancements to women’s agency for instrumental and intrinsic reasons particularly through innovations in family planning and microfinance. The “Bangladesh paradox” of improved wellbeing despite low...
#1Maren DuvendackH-Index: 11
Last.W. Robert ReedH-Index: 20
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This paper discusses recent trends in the use of replications in economics. We include the results of recent replication studies that have attempted to identify replication rates within the discipline. These studies generally find that replication rates are relatively low. We then consider obstacles to undertaking replication studies and highlight replication initiatives in psychology and political science, behind which economics appears to lag.
#1Maren DuvendackH-Index: 11
Last.Laura CamfieldH-Index: 22
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Impact evaluation is an important tool in research and policy making, as policymakers and donor agencies are under increasing pressure to justify public spending on social and economic interventions. This book will guide the reader through both the basic and more advanced methods of impact evaluation, with a particular focus on impact evaluation within evidence-based policy making and in international development. It will address the design, commissioning, and management of impact evaluations, d...
#1Vegard Iversen (University of Manchester)H-Index: 13
#2Richard Palmer-Jones (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 17
We reply to Robert Jensen and Emily Oster’s (2014) response to our replication of their QJE paper and Berk Ozler’s recent blog. We first summarize Jensen and Oster’s empirical findings and proceed to briefly explain our own main results. Then we address and engage with the issues raised by and the claims and arguments of JO (2014) and Ozler.
#1Maren DuvendackH-Index: 11
Last.W. Robert ReedH-Index: 20
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This study reports on various aspects of replication research in economics. It includes (i) a brief history of data sharing and replication; (ii) the results of the authors’ survey administered to the editors of all 333 “Economics” journals listed in Web of Science in December 2013; (iii) an analysis of 155 replication studies that have been published in peer-reviewed economics journals from 1977-2014; (iv) a discussion of the future of replication research in economics, and (v) observations on ...
#1Laura Camfield (Department for International Development)H-Index: 22
#2Maren DuvendackH-Index: 11
Last.Richard Palmer-JonesH-Index: 17
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The thrust for evidence‐based policymaking has paid little attention to problems of bias. Statistical evidence is more fragile than generally understood, and false positives are all too likely given the incentives of policymakers and academic and professional evaluators. Well‐known cognitive biases make bias likely for not dissimilar reasons in qualitative and mixed methods evaluations. What we term delinquent organisational isomorphism promotes purportedly scientific evaluations in inappropriat...
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