Match!
Stephen J. Sharp
University of Cambridge
298Publications
64H-index
14.3kCitations
Publications 298
Newest
Miriam Alvarado2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Cambridge),
Nigel Unwin6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Cambridge)
+ 5 AuthorsJean Adams29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Cambridge)
Background The World Health Organization has advocated for sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) taxes as part of a broader non-communicable disease prevention strategy, and these taxes have been recently introduced in a wide range of settings. However, much is still unknown about how SSB taxes operate in various contexts and as a result of different tax designs. In 2015, the Government of Barbados implemented a 10% ad valorem (value-based) tax on SSBs. It has been hypothesized that this tax structure ...
Published on Jun 20, 2019
Fumiaki Imamura27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Matthias B. Schulze67
Estimated H-index: 67
+ 40 AuthorsDagfinn Aune37
Estimated H-index: 37
The InterAct project was funded by the EU FP6 program (LSHM_CT_2006_037197). InterAct investigators acknowledge funding from the following agencies: Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit Core Support (MC_UU_12015/1, MC_UU_12015/5);
Published on 2019in Patient Education and Counseling2.82
Max Bayne (University of Cambridge), Madi Fairey (University of Cambridge)+ 5 AuthorsJuliet Usher-Smith15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Cambridge)
Abstract Objective To synthesize the literature on the effect of provision of personalised cancer risk information to individuals at population level risk on accuracy of risk perception and psychological responses. Methods A systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of articles published from 01/01/2000 to 01/07/2017. Results We included 23 studies. Immediately after provision of risk information 87% of individuals were able to recall the absolute risk estimate. Less than half believed ...
Published on Feb 12, 2019
Barbora Silarova5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Stephen J. Sharp64
Estimated H-index: 64
+ 12 AuthorsZoe Tolkien3
Estimated H-index: 3
This work was supported by a European Commission Framework 7 EPIC-CVD Grant agreement no: 279233. NHS Blood and Transplant funded the INTERVAL trial. DNA extraction and genotyping in INTERVAL/INFORM was funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The coordinating team for INTERVAL/INFORM at the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit of the University of Cambridge was supported by core funding from: UK Medical Research Council (G0800270), British Heart Foundation (SP/09/002), British Heart Fo...
Published on Jan 25, 2019in Heart5.08
Barbora Silarova5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Cambridge),
Stephen J. Sharp64
Estimated H-index: 64
(University of Cambridge)
+ 12 AuthorsZoe Tolkien3
Estimated H-index: 3
Objective To determine whether provision of web-based lifestyle advice and coronary heart disease risk information either based on phenotypic characteristics or phenotypic plus genetic characteristics affects changes in objectively measured health behaviours. Methods A parallel-group, open randomised trial including 956 male and female blood donors with no history of cardiovascular disease (mean [SD] age=56.7 [8.8] years) randomised to four study groups: control group (no information provided); ...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in British Journal of General Practice4.43
Golnessa Masson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cambridge),
Katie Mills4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Cambridge)
+ 4 AuthorsJuliet Usher-Smith15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Cambridge)
Background Prevention offers an effective public health strategy for cancer control. One approach that could be incorporated within general practice is the provision of personalised risk information. Few trial data are available concerning the impact of cancer risk information on behaviour. Aim To assess the short-term effects on computed cancer risk and self-reported health-related behaviours of providing personalised cancer risk information. Method A total of 1018 participants, recruited throu...
Published on Apr 24, 2019in Journal of Nutrition4.42
Franziska Jannasch3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Janine Kröger23
Estimated H-index: 23
+ 38 AuthorsCourtney Dow6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Paris-Sud)
BACKGROUND: Population-specificity of exploratory dietary patterns limits their generalizability in investigations with type 2 diabetes incidence. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to derive country-specific exploratory dietary patterns, investigate their association with type 2 diabetes incidence, and replicate diabetes-associated dietary patterns in other countries. METHODS: Dietary intake data were used, assessed by country-specific questionnaires at baseline of 11,183 incident diabetes ca...
Published on Apr 17, 2019in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Ju-Sheng Zheng18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Cambridge),
Fumiaki Imamura27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Cambridge)
+ 7 AuthorsNita G. Forouhi77
Estimated H-index: 77
(University of Cambridge)
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Diabetes Care15.27
Linda E.T. Vissers3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UU: Utrecht University),
Ivonne Sluijs28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UU: Utrecht University)
+ 33 AuthorsMaria Dolores Chirlaque44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Murcia)
OBJECTIVE To estimate the causal association between intake of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The analysis included 21,820 European individuals (9,686 diabetes cases) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study. Participants were genotyped, and rs4988235 (LCT-12910C>T), a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for lactase persistence (LP) that enables digestion of dairy sugar, i.e., lactose, was imp...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Cell36.22
Luca A. Lotta12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Cambridge),
Jacek Mokrosinski4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Cambridge)
+ 16 AuthorsNicholas Bowker2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Cambridge)
Summary The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor whose disruption causes obesity. We functionally characterized 61 MC4R variants identified in 0.5 million people from UK Biobank and examined their associations with body mass index (BMI) and obesity-related cardiometabolic diseases. We found that the maximal efficacy of β-arrestin recruitment to MC4R, rather than canonical Gα s -mediated cyclic adenosine-monophosphate production, explained 88% of the variance in the asso...
12345678910