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Luseadra McKerracher
McMaster University
MayaBreastfeedingPregnancyPopulationMedicine
13Publications
4H-index
34Citations
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Publications 16
Newest
#1Luseadra McKerracher (McMaster University)H-Index: 4
#2Tina Moffat (McMaster University)H-Index: 11
Last. Deborah M. SlobodaH-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
Environmental factors affecting development through embryogenesis, pregnancy, and infancy impact health through all subsequent stages of life. Known as the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis, this concept is widely accepted among health and social scientists. However, it is unclear whether DOHaD-based ideas are reaching the general public and/or influencing behaviour. This study thus investigated whether and under what circumstances pregnant people in Canada are famil...
1 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Pablo A. Nepomnaschy (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 9
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Variation in the durations of exclusive breastfeeding (exBF) and any breastfeeding (anyBF) is associated with socioecological factors. This plasticity in breastfeeding behavior appears adaptive, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. With this concept in mind, we investigated whether durations of exBF and anyBF in a rural Maya population covary with markers of a form of socioecological change—market integration—and whether individual factors (individual learning, physiological plasticity) and/...
Source
#1L. McKerracher (McMaster University)
#2Tina Moffat (McMaster University)H-Index: 11
Last. Deborah M. Sloboda (McMaster University)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
Evidence supporting the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis indicates that improving early life environments can reduce non-communicable disease risks and improve health over the lifecourse. A widespread understanding of this evidence may help to reshape structures, guidelines and individual behaviors to better the developmental conditions for the next generations. Yet, few efforts have yet been made to translate the DOHaD concept beyond the research community. To unde...
Source
#1P. J. Varas Enriquez (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 1
#2Luseadra McKerracher (McMaster University)H-Index: 4
Last. Michael G. Elliot (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Mark Collard (King's College, Aberdeen)H-Index: 1
Last. Pablo A. Nepomnaschy (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
AbstractBackground: Economic transitions expose indigenous populations to a variety of ecological and cultural challenges, especially regarding diet and stress. These kinds of challenges are predicted by evolutionary ecological theory to have fitness consequences (differential reproduction) and, indeed, are often associated with changes in fertility dynamics. It is currently unclear whether international immigration might impact the nature of such an economic transition or its consequences for f...
1 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
Last. Pablo A. Nepomnaschy (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Objectives The causes of variation in breastfeeding duration in humans are poorly understood, but life history factors related to maternal energetics drive much of the variation in lactation duration in nonhuman animals. With this in mind, we investigated whether four energy-related factors influence variation in breastfeeding duration in a non-industrial human population: (1) mortality risk during mother's development (assessed via mother's adult height), (2) reliance on nutrient-dense weaning ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Trine Kellberg Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 2
#2Blas M. Benito (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 10
Last. Peter C. Kjaeaergaard (Wild Center)H-Index: 10
view all 7 authors...
Abstract When dealing with the northern boundary of Neanderthals ( Homo neanderthalensis ) and the question of whether or not they dispersed into Southern Scandinavia, two contradictory hypotheses can be identified. The first, and also the most widely endorsed, hereafter, hypothesis A, argues primarily that Neanderthals did not occupy regions above 55°N because of 1) climatic constraints and 2) dispersal barriers. The second, hypothesis B, argues that they possibly occasionally dispersed above 5...
9 CitationsSource
#2Mark CollardH-Index: 1
Last. Michael P. RichardsH-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
#1Joseph Carroll (UMSL: University of Missouri–St. Louis)H-Index: 12
#2Mathias Clasen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 4
Last. Peter C. Kjaeaergaard (Wild Center)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
8 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
Last. Joseph Henrich (Harvard University)H-Index: 60
view all 3 authors...
Women often experience novel food aversions and cravings during pregnancy. These appetite changes have been hypothesized to work alongside cultural strategies as adaptive responses to the challenges posed by pregnancy (e.g., maternal immune suppression). Here, we report a study that assessed whether data from an indigenous population in Fiji are consistent with the predictions of this hypothesis. We found that aversions focus predominantly on foods expected to exacerbate the challenges of pregna...
6 CitationsSource
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