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Catherine A. Hartley
New York University
39Publications
18H-index
1,608Citations
Publications 40
Newest
#1Kate Nussenbaum (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 2
#2Catherine A. Hartley (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 18
Abstract The past decade has seen the emergence of the use of reinforcement learning models to study developmental change in value-based learning. It is unclear, however, whether these computational modeling studies, which have employed a wide variety of tasks and model variants, have reached convergent conclusions. In this review, we examine whether the tuning of model parameters that govern different aspects of learning and decision-making processes vary consistently as a function of age, and ...
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#1Hillary A. Raab (NYU: New York University)
#2Catherine A. Hartley (Center for Neural Science)H-Index: 18
Behavioural neuroscience and reinforcement learning theory distinguish between ‘model-free’ and ‘model-based’ computations that can guide behaviour. A recent study demonstrates that Pavlovian learning can give rise to behavioural responses that are not well accounted for by this existing dichotomy, suggesting that there may be greater complexity to the computations that underlie Pavlovian prediction.
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#1Gail M. Rosenbaum (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 6
#2Catherine A. Hartley (Center for Neural Science)H-Index: 18
Epidemiological data suggest that risk taking in the real world increases from childhood into adolescence and declines into adulthood. However, developmental patterns of behaviour in laboratory ass...
3 CitationsSource
#1Alexandra O. Cohen (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 10
#2Nicholas G. Matese (NYU: New York University)
Last.Catherine A. Hartley (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 18
view all 7 authors...
Adolescence is often filled with positive and negative emotional experiences that may change how individuals remember and respond to stimuli in their environment. In adults, aversive events can both enhance memory for associated stimuli as well as generalize to enhance memory for unreinforced but conceptually related stimuli. The present study tested whether learned aversive associations similarly lead to better memory and generalization across a category of stimuli in adolescents. Participants ...
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#1Catherine A. Hartley (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 18
#2Cesar A.O. Coelho (UNIFESP: Federal University of São Paulo)H-Index: 3
Last.Elizabeth A. Phelps (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 73
view all 5 authors...
Rationale Pavlovian conditioned responses to cues that signal threat are rapidly acquired and tend to persist over time. However, recent research suggests that the ability to actively avoid or exert control over an anticipated threat can diminish the subsequent expression of Pavlovian responses. Studies in animal models suggest that active avoidance behavior and its consequences may be mediated by dopaminergic function. In the present study, we sought to replicate the finding that active control...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kate NussenbaumH-Index: 2
#2Alexandra O. CohenH-Index: 10
Last.Catherine A. HartleyH-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
#1Lindasy E Hunter (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
#2Aaron M. Bornstein (Princeton University)H-Index: 6
Last.Catherine A. Hartley (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
Humans and animals consistently forego, or 9discount9 future rewards in favor of more proximal, but less valuable, options. This behavior is often thought of in terms of a failure of 9self-control9, a lack of inhibition when considering the possibility of immediate gratification. However, rather than overweighting the near-term reward, the same behavior can result from failing to properly consider the far-off reward. The capacity to plan for future gains is a core construct in Reinforcement Lear...
3 CitationsSource
#1Dylan G. Gee (Yale University)H-Index: 24
#2Kevin G. Bath (Brown University)H-Index: 31
Last.Catherine A. Hartley (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 18
view all 7 authors...
The ability to anticipate and respond appropriately to the challenges and opportunities present in our environments is critical for adaptive behavior. Recent methodological innovations have led to substantial advances in our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting such motivated behavior in adulthood. However, the neural circuits and cognitive processes that enable threat- and reward-motivated behavior undergo substantive changes over the course of development, and these changes are less ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Katherine E. Powers (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
#2Gideon Yaffe (Yale University)H-Index: 10
Last.Leah H. Somerville (Harvard University)H-Index: 33
view all 6 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Hillary A. Raab (NYU: New York University)
#2Catherine A. Hartley (Center for Neural Science)H-Index: 18
Abstract Throughout our lives, we face the ongoing challenge of discovering which actions are beneficial and which are not. In order to maximize reward and minimize punishment across diverse environments, individuals must learn to flexibly take actions that are likely to yield a desired outcome. This type of “goal-directed” action selection is distinguished from a “habitual” tendency to simply repeat actions that have been rewarded in the past. In this chapter, we adopt a theoretical framework s...
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