Match!
Stephen Shennan
University College London
ArchaeologySociocultural evolutionGeographyPopulationHistory
220Publications
39H-index
6,203Citations
What is this?
Publications 224
Newest
#1Kevan EdinboroughH-Index: 17
#2Stephen ShennanH-Index: 39
Last. Peter SchauerH-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
1 CitationsSource
Due to a typesetting mistake, the images of Figs 2 and 3 were mistakenly switched. The original version has been corrected.
Source
#1Peter Schauer (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 1
#2Andrew Bevan (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 20
Last. Mike Parker Pearson (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Neolithic stone axeheads from Britain provide an unusually rich, well-provenanced set of evidence with which to consider patterns of prehistoric production and exchange. It is no surprise then that these objects have often been subject to spatial analysis in terms of the relationship between particular stone source areas and the distribution of axeheads made from those stones. At stake in such analysis are important interpretative issues to do with how we view the role of material value, supply,...
Source
#1Sue ColledgeH-Index: 27
#2James ConollyH-Index: 16
Last. Stephen ShennanH-Index: 39
view all 4 authors...
The focus of this paper is the Neolithic of northwest Europe, where a rapid growth in population between ~5950 and ~5550 cal yr BP, is followed by a decline that lasted until ~4950 cal yr BP. The timing of the increase in population density correlates with the local appearance of farming and is attributed to the advantageous effects of agriculture. However, the subsequent population decline has yet to be satisfactorily explained. One possible explanation is the reduction in yields in Neolithic c...
1 CitationsSource
Source
#1Kevan EdinboroughH-Index: 17
#2Stephen ShennanH-Index: 39
Last. Peter SchauerH-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
1 Citations
Source
#1Peter Schauer (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 1
#2Stephen Shennan (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 39
Last. Mike Parker Pearson (UCL Institute of Archaeology)H-Index: 22
view all 8 authors...
Abstract The extent to which non-agricultural production in prehistory had cost-benefit motivations has long been a subject of discussion. This paper addresses the topic by looking at the evidence for Neolithic quarrying and mining in Britain and continental northwest Europe and asks whether changing production through time was influenced by changing demand. Radiocarbon dating of mine and quarry sites is used to define periods of use. These are then correlated with a likely first-order source of...
2 CitationsSource
#1Miljana Radivojević (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research)H-Index: 6
#2Benjamin W. Roberts (Durham University)H-Index: 9
Last. Cyprian Broodbank (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research)H-Index: 2
view all 14 authors...
Bronze is the defining metal of the European Bronze Age and has been at the center of archaeological and science-based research for well over a century. Archaeometallurgical studies have largely focused on determining the geological origin of the constituent metals, copper and tin, and their movement from producer to consumer sites. More recently, the effects of recycling, both temporal and spatial, on the composition of the circulating metal stock have received much attention. Also, discussions...
8 CitationsSource
#1Felix Riede (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 15
#2Christian Steven Hoggard (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 2
Last. Stephen Shennan (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 39
view all 3 authors...
The analysis of ancient genomes is having a major impact on archaeological interpretations. Yet, the methodological divide between these disciplines is substantial. Fundamentally, there is an urgent need to reconcile archaeological and genetic taxonomies. However, traditional archaeological taxonomies are problematic because they are epistemologically weak and often laden with undue assumptions about past ethnicity and demography—they are a hindrance rather than a help in such a reconciliation. ...
2 CitationsSource
12345678910