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Adam J. Vanbergen
Institut national de la recherche agronomique
81Publications
28H-index
2,603Citations
Publications 81
Newest
#1Adam J. Vanbergen (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 28
#2Simon G. Potts (University of Reading)H-Index: 58
Last.Thomas Tscheulin (University of the Aegean)H-Index: 17
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Abstract Worldwide urbanisation and use of mobile and wireless technologies (5G, Internet of Things) is leading to the proliferation of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and campaigning voices continue to call for the risk to human health and wildlife to be recognised. Pollinators provide many benefits to nature and humankind, but face multiple anthropogenic threats. Here, we assess whether artificial light at night (ALAN) and anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (A...
#1Sarah A. McCormackH-Index: 1
#2Nick OstleH-Index: 45
Last.Adam J. VanbergenH-Index: 28
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Background and aims Biochar addition to soil is a carbon capture and storage option with potential to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, yet the consequences for soil organisms and linked ecosystem processes are inconsistent or unknown. We tested biochar impact on soil biodiversity, ecosystem functions, and their interactions, in temperate agricultural soils.
#1John W. Redhead (University of Reading)H-Index: 15
#2Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 31
Last.Tom H. Oliver (University of Reading)H-Index: 26
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Understanding spatial variation in the structure and stability of plant-pollinator networks, and their relationship with anthropogenic drivers, is key to maintaining pollination services and mitigating declines. Constructing sufficient networks to examine patterns over large spatial scales remains challenging. Using biological records (citizen science), we constructed potential plant-pollinator networks at 10km resolution across Great Britain, comprising all potential interactions inferred from ...
#1Elizabeth M. Hill (University of Sussex)H-Index: 29
#2Lynne Robinson (University of Sussex)H-Index: 2
Last.Suzanne Hartley (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 43
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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonisation of plant roots is one of the most ancient and widespread interactions in ecology, yet the systemic consequences for plant secondary chemistry remain unclear. We performed the first metabolomic investigation into the impact of AMF colonisation by Rhizophagus irregularis on the chemical defences, spanning above- and below-ground tissues, in its host-plant ragwort (Senecio jacobaea). We used a non-targeted metabolomics approach to profile, and where ...
#1Adam J. VanbergenH-Index: 28
#2Anahí Espíndola (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 11
Last.Marcelo A. Aizen (CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)H-Index: 44
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Invasive alien species modify pollinator biodiversity and the services they provide that underpin ecosystem function and human well-being. Building on the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) global assessment of pollinators and pollination, we synthesize current understanding of invasive alien impacts on pollinators and pollination. Invasive alien species create risks and opportunities for pollinator nutrition, re-organize species interaction...
#1Tracie Marie Evans (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 1
#2Stephen CaversH-Index: 21
Last.Matthew S. HeardH-Index: 30
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Landscape heterogeneity in floral communities has the potential to modify pollinator behavior. Pollinator foraging varies with the diversity, abundance, and spatial configuration of floral resources. However, the implications of this variation for pollen transfer and ultimately the reproductive success of insect pollinated plants remains unclear, especially for species which are rare or isolated in the landscape. We used a landscape-scale experiment, coupled with microsatellite genotyping, to ex...
1. Riparian invertebrate communities occupy a dynamic ecotone where hydrogeomorphological (e.g. river flows) and ecological (e.g. succession) processes may govern assemblage structure by filtering species according to their traits (e.g. dispersal capacity, niche). 2. We surveyed terrestrial invertebrate assemblages (millipedes, carabid beetles, spiders) in 28 river islands across four river catchments over two years. We predicted that distinct ecological niches would produce taxon-specific respo...
#1Adam J. VanbergenH-Index: 28
#2Ben A. WoodcockH-Index: 31
Last.Daniel S. ChapmanH-Index: 20
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1. Pollinator network structure arising from the extent and strength of interspecific mutualistic interactions can promote species persistence and community robustness. However, environmental change may re-organise network structure limiting capacity to absorb or resist shocks and increasing species extinctions. 2. We investigated if habitat disturbance and the level of mutualism dependence between species affected the robustness of insect–flower visitation networks Following a recently develope...
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