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Rosemary G. Gillespie
University of California, Berkeley
157Publications
39H-index
6,820Citations
Publications 158
Newest
The study of biodiversity started as a single unified field that spanned both ecology and evolution and both macro and micro phenomena. But over the 20th century, major trends drove ecology and evolution apart and pushed an emphasis towards the micro perspective in both disciplines. Macroecology and macroevolution re‐emerged as self‐consciously distinct fields in the 1970s and 1980s, but they remain largely separated from each other. Here, we argue that despite the challenges, it is worth workin...
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#1Kari Roesch Goodman (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 7
#2Stefan Prost (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 15
Last.Rosemary G. Gillespie (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
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#1Henrik Krehenwinkel (University of Trier)
#2Susanne Meese (University of Greifswald)
Last.Gabriele Uhl (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 26
view all 12 authors...
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#1Susan R. Kennedy (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 4
#2Jun Ying Lim (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 6
Last.Rosemary G. Gillespie (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
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#1Jeremy C. Andersen (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 7
#2Peter T. Oboyski (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 5
Last.George K. Roderick (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 12 authors...
New genetic diagnostic approaches have greatly aided efforts to document global biodiversity and improve biosecurity. This is especially true for organismal groups in which species diversity has been underestimated historically due to difficulties associated with sampling, the lack of clear morphological characteristics, and/or limited availability of taxonomic expertise. Among these methods, DNA sequence barcoding (also known as “DNA barcoding”) and by extension, meta‐barcoding for biological c...
Source
#1Henrik Krehenwinkel (University of Trier)H-Index: 8
#2Susan R. Kennedy (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 4
Last.Rosemary G. Gillespie (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 6 authors...
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#1Anna E. Hiller (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 1
#2Michelle S. Koo (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 10
Last.Rosemary G. Gillespie (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 6 authors...
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#1Henrik Krehenwinkel (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 8
#2Aaron Pomerantz (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 4
Last.Stefan Prost (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 15
view all 11 authors...
11 CitationsSource
#1Freek T. Bakker (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 29
#2Alexandre Antonelli (Royal Botanic Gardens)H-Index: 31
Last.Mari KällersjöH-Index: 38
view all 21 authors...
Source
#1Lauren C. Ponisio (UCR: University of California, Riverside)H-Index: 10
#2Fernanda S. Valdovinos (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
Last.Rosemary G. Gillespie (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
view all 9 authors...
Species interactions are responsible for many key mechanisms that govern the dynamics of ecological communities. Variation in the way interactions are organized among species results in different network structures, which translates into a community's ability to resist collapse and change. To better understand the factors involved in dictating ongoing dynamics in a community at a given time, we must unravel how interactions affect the assembly process. Here, we build a novel, integrative concept...
3 CitationsSource
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